Dec 04, 2021  
2020-2021 General Catalog 
    
2020-2021 General Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 120A - Thinking Like a Scientist


    Unit(s): 2
    First course of a two-course series. Topics include logic, critical thinking, the scientific method, data analysis, statistics, ethics, science and society, problem solving, and college transition elements.

    Prerequisite(s): Freshman status and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 125A and GE math eligible.
    GE Category: Upon completion of CHEM 120B in the spring with a Cor better, the course will satisfy the category A3 GE requirement.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 120B - Thinking Like a Scientist


    Unit(s): 2
    Second course of a two course series. Topics include logic, critical thinking, the scientific method, data analysis, statistics, ethics, science and society, problem solving, and college transition elements. Students should be concurrently enrolled in CHEM 125B.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 120A and concurrently enrolled in CHEM 125B
    GE Category: Upon completion of CHEM 120B with a C- or better, the course will satisfy the category A3 GE requirement..
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 255 - Quantitative Analysis


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 6 hours
    Theory and practice of methods of analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, and selected instrumental techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115B.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 275 - Instrumental Analysis


    Unit(s): 2
    This course focuses on the theory behind commonly used chemistry instruments. Lecture will focus on analysis of spectroscopic data (molecular transitions), an overview of instrumental hardware, and principles of chromatography. Topics include basic electronics, statistics, optics, signal to noise detectors, IR, optical, NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, atomic absorption, and chromatography.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 335B and CHEM 255 or CHEM 125B.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 310A - Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    Development and applications of the concepts of thermodynamics, equilibrium, and kinetics.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115B or CHEM 125B; MATH 211; PHYS 210B or PHYS 214.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    CHEM 310B - Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    Introduction to the concepts of quantum mechanics and its application to chemical bonding and spectroscopy.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115B or CHEM 125B; MATH 211, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    CHEM 315 - Introduction to Research Methods in Chemistry


    Unit(s): 1
    Chemistry 315 is designed for Chemistry majors but may be taken by others. Students will learn about research in Chemistry at SSU and then will choose a research project with a faculty mentor. This course will focus on preparation of a proposal to be performed in the subsequent semester. Topics such as scientific ethics, literature, and writing will also be covered.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 335B.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 316 - Research Methods in Chemistry


    Unit(s): 2
    Chemistry 316 is the second part of a year-long course designed for Chemistry majors. Students will execute the research proposal developed in CHEM 315. Research will be done under the mentorship of faculty. Students will meet weekly to discuss research progress. Students will conclude the semester with a research manuscript.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 315.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 325 - Inorganic Chemistry


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    Atomic structure, symmetry, and group theory of small molecules and the relationship of these concepts to bonding theory and molecular spectroscopy. Applications of symmetry and group theory to coordination chemistry of transition metal complexes in organometallic, environmental, bioinorganic, and materials chemistry. Other topics include kinetics and reaction mechanisms of inorganic and organometallic compounds including electron transfer.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 310B and CHEM 401.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 335A - Organic Chemistry


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    A study of the fundamental principles of organic chemistry including bonding, electrophilicity, nucleophilicity, and molecular shapes and geometry for organic compounds. Applies these concepts to the study of the properties, syntheses, and reactions of major classes of organic compounds. A special emphasis is given to reaction mechanisms.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115B.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    CHEM 335B - Organic Chemistry


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    Continuation of CHEM 335A.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 335A.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    CHEM 336A - Organic Chemistry Lab I


    Unit(s): 2 Lecture: 1 hour Laboratory: 3 hours
    Fundamental techniques in organic chemistry, emphasizing separation techniques, modern instrumental methods, and qualitative organic analysis. Designed to complement CHEM 335A.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 335A. Co-requisite(s): CHEM 335A.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    CHEM 336B - Organic Chemistry Lab II


    Unit(s): 2 Lecture: 1 hour Laboratory: 3 hours
    Fundamental techniques of organic chemistry, emphasizing synthetic organic chemistry, modern instrumental methods, and qualitative organic analysis. Designed to complement CHEM 335B.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 336A and 335B. Co-requisite(s): CHEM 335B.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    CHEM 397 - Chemistry Practicum


    Unit(s): 1-6
    Supervised chemistry work experiences that involve practical application of previously studied theory. Intended for professional growth and/or collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for up to a total of 6 units. Two hours of work per week for each unit of credit.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    CHEM 401 - Senior Integrated Lab


    Unit(s): 3 Discussion: 1 unit Laboratory: 2 units
    This course focuses on making connections between the sub-disciplines of chemistry by performing experiments that cross over between these sub-disciplines in this capstone course. Students will perform experiments independently. Students will learn to properly write up their results in a format similar to published papers. This course is for graduating seniors and is the capstone for B.A. Chemistry majors.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 255 and senior standing. CHEM 275. Completion of GE Areas A1, A2, A3, and B4 with C- or better.  Completion of GE Areas B1 and B2. Co-requisite(s): CHEM 275
    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area Upper Division B (Science/Quantitative Reasoning).
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 402 - Advanced Synthesis and Instrumental Analysis


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 1 hour Laboratory: 6 hours
    Project-based synthesis, purification, and characterization of inorganic, organic, and organometallic molecules. Capstone course for the B.S. chemistry degree. Topics will include air-sensitive syntheses, standard Schlenk line techniques, characterization through IR, optical and NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and electrochemistry. This course is for graduating seniors and is the capstone for BS Chemistry majors.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 401.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 441 - Biochemical Methods


    Unit(s): 3
    Project based course involving characterization of proteins from natural sources utilizing biochemical methods and experimental design techniques common in biotechnology and research. This course is for graduating seniors and is the capstone for B.S. Biochemistry majors.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 445 or CHEM 446 (may be concurrent), CHEM 255, and a foundation in spectroscopy; kinetics strongly recommended.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 445 - Structural Biochemistry


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    A study of the structure-function relationships of amino acids, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Also includes topics such as enzyme kinetics, membrane transport, and signaling.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 335B and a foundation in kinetics and thermodynamics, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 446 - Metabolic Biochemistry


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    A study of bioenergetics and the metabolism of biological molecules including carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 335B or CHEM 232; CHEM 445 or BIOL 130; and a foundation in kinetics and thermodynamics, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 492 - Chemistry Seminar Series


    Unit(s): 1
    Invited speakers from universities and industry will present on current topics in the chemical and biochemical fields.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated; does not count towards the major.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    CHEM 494 - Undergraduate Research


    Unit(s): 1-6
    Under supervision by the Chemistry faculty, students will participate in individual investigations of student- or faculty-initiated chemical problems. May be taken only by petition to the Chemistry Department.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated.
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 495 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-3
    Investigation of existing information on a specific or general topic of interest to the student.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor; upper-division standing in chemistry or closely related science.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit up to 8 units.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    CHEM 496 - Selected Topics in Chemistry


    Unit(s): 1-6
    A study of an advanced topic in chemistry.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 335B.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit with new subject matter.
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 497 - Research Seminar


    Unit(s): 1 Laboratory: 3 hours
    Capstone course for B.A. and B.S. degrees. The course will focus on techniques involved in the preparation and delivery of technical seminars. This final project will be a formal oral presentation to the Chemistry department on a research paper from the chemical literature or the student’s undergraduate research project. Instruction includes the appropriate coverage of the selected topic, use of the chemical literature, and the reparation and use of PowerPoint, graphic, and web-based applications to create an informative talk.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 401. Co-requisite(s): CHEM 401.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CHEM 499 - Internship


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Chemistry field experience in industrial, hospital, or similar laboratory settings. Enrollment by prior arrangement with supervising faculty member and community sponsor. Please see department advisor for details. Internship assignments may be paid.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated.
    Grading: CNC

Communication and Media Studies

  
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    COMS 125 - Oral Presentation & Media


    Unit(s): 3 Discussion: 3
    This course is designed to enhance your ability to construct and deliver speeches in a public forum or front of a camera. The method for improving your public speaking will be a combination of theory, critical analysis and practice. By the end of the semester, students should be able to construct and deliver three different types of speeches in front of an audience and be able to critically analyze other speeches.

    GE Category: Written & Oral Analysis (A1)
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
  
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    COMS 160A - Humanities Learning Community


    Unit(s): 4
    COMS 160A/COMS 160B is a year long course, which features weekly lectures and small seminars. It constitutes a Humanities Learning Community (HLC) for any first-year student.

    GE Category: The learning objectives of the HLC will satisfy A3 (Critical Thinking) and C3 (Comparative Perspectives and/or Foreign Languages) GE Areas. C- or better required in the second semester for A3 credit.
    Typically Offered Fall Odd Years
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 160B - Humanities Learning Community


    Unit(s): 4
    COMS 160A/B is a year long course, which features weekly lectures and small seminars. It constitutes a Humanities Learning Community (HLC) for any first-year student.

    Prerequisite(s): COMS 160A.
    GE Category: The learning objectives of the HLC will satisfy A3 (Critical Thinking) and C3 (Comparative Perspectives and/or Foreign Languages) GE Areas. C- or better required in the second semester for A3 credit.
    Typically Offered Spring Even Years
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 162A - Humanities Learning Community Media Literacy


    Unit(s): 4
    COMS 162A/COMS 162B is a year long course, which, features weekly lectures and small seminars. It constitutes a Humanities Learning Community (HLC) for any first-year student.

    GE Category: The learning objectives of the HLC will satisfy A3 (Critical Thinking and C3 (Comparative Perspectives and/or Foreign Languages) GE categories. C- or better required in the second semester for A3 credit.
    Typically Offered Fall Even Years
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 162B - Humanities Learning Community Media Literacy


    Unit(s): 4
    COMS 162A/B is a year long course, which, features weekly lectures and small seminars. It constitutes a Humanities Learning Community (HLC) for any first-year student.

    Prerequisite(s): COMS 162A.
    GE Category: The learning objectives of the HLC will satisfy A3 (Critical Thinking and C3 (Comparative Perspectives and/or Foreign Languages) GE categories. C- or better required in the second semester for A3 credit.
    Typically Offered Spring Odd Years
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 200 - Principles of Media Communication


    Unit(s): 4
    An introduction to the history of mass communication, the mechanics of the mass communication industries, and theories of mass communication as a social, cultural, and political phenomenon.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Communication Studies Majors.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 201 - Video Production


    Unit(s): 4
    A course for beginning video students. Assignments include: creation of skits and music videos; and conducting interviews using DV camcorders. Students also do a final creative project of their own.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Communication Studies Majors.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 202 - Methods of Media Criticism


    Unit(s): 4
    A survey of ways to analyze mediated texts, with a focus on film, television, magazines, music, news, and advertising. Methods and concepts include semiotics, structuralism, ideology, psychoanalysis, feminism, and postmodernism.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Communication Studies Majors.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 210 - Web and Print Journalism


    Unit(s): 4
    Introduction to a wide range of writing styles and formats, from hard news to features. Students learn to write for newspapers, magazines, television, radio, and the internet.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Communication Studies Majors.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 215 - Digital Media Design and Content Delivery


    Unit(s): 4.00
    A hands-on exploration of digital design and communication fundamentals, including how multimedia content is presented and delivered to audiences; best practices for website and mobile UX and UI; trends in audio, video, text, photo, and graphic usage via mobile, social, and digital media; and other emerging interactive media trends.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 240 - Public Relations


    Unit(s): 4
    An overview of the history, structure, and organization of public relations. Students also learn the basic public relations tactics of writing, presentation, event organization, and web communication.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Communication Studies Majors.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Teaching Mode: Taught face-to-face during the semester, hybrid or online during winter and summer session. Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 265 - Radio and Audio Production


    Unit(s): 4
    History of broadcasting; evolution of broadcast technology; introduction to basic theories and techniques of radio broadcasting. Overview of radio station organization, programming, and operation. Experience in radio program development and production techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Communication Studies Majors.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 273 - SYRCE: Topics in COMS


    Unit(s): 4
    This course examines seminal moments in history that shaped the future of media by identifying key tropes in the encoding and decoding of content. The course critiques traditional values, ethics and philosophies in order to portray the truth of the times as viewed through the lens of mediated communications.

    Prerequisite(s): completion of GE Category A2 (ENGL 101 or ENGL 100B) required.
    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area C2. Only one course numbered 273 in the Arts & Humanities will be considered for credit.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 275 - 21st Century Television As Art


    Unit(s): 4
    This course explores the “New Golden Age” of TV that arguably began with The Sopranos and which may, perhaps, be considered “art.” Students will weigh relevant social and technological changes, study debates over subjectivity, taste, and cultural hierarchies, and assess what might distinguish these new shows from TV of old. Non-Majors Need Dept, Approval.

    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area C1 (Fine Arts, Theatre, Dance, Music, and Film).
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face & Online. Grading: OPT
  
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    COMS 301 - Media Theory and Research


    Unit(s): 4
    Intermediate-level study of the key research events that contributed to the development of communication theories, government policy, and the emergence of communication as an academic discipline.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Communication Studies Juniors, Seniors; Either completion of COMS 200 and 202 or completion of COMS 200 and concurrent enrollment of COMS 202 or completion of COMS 202 and concurrent enrollment of COMS 200.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face & Online. Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 302 - Media Ethics and Law


    Unit(s): 4
    The course will examine controversial ethical issues related to the media including sensationalism, bias, and deception. It will also cover how the media is regulated, as well as legal issues related to the First Amendment, libel, privacy, copyright, confidentially, obscenity, the right to a fair trial, advertising law the Freedom of Information and Open Meetings Acts.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Communication Studies Juniors, Seniors; Either completion of COMS 200 and 202 or completion of COMS 200 and concurrent enrollment of COMS 202 or completion of COMS 202 and concurrent enrollment of COMS 200.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face & Online. Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 320 - Selected Topics in COMS


    Unit(s): 4
    Intensive study of various topics and trends in the mass media, including advertising, propaganda and persuasion; children and the media; technical and scriptwriting; environmental and international communication; and film.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Communication Studies majors only
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for additional credit with new subject matter.
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face & Online. Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 321 - International Communication


    Unit(s): 4
    Course develops a basic understanding of current issues related to the field of international communication. Surveys readings and videos on global media (MTV, CNN, ESPN, theme parks, video games, advertising, media campaigns for social change, computer hackers, Sesame Street, etc.). Overseas job and volunteer opportunities discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Communication Studies majors only
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 322 - Broadcast Journalism


    Unit(s): 4
    Introductory class on the art and craft of Journalism, print, video, and radio, by career professionals. Designed to give students a taste of real world media experience.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Communication Studies majors only
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    COMS 323 - Health Science and Environmental Journalism


    Unit(s): 4
    Course will focus on research, reporting skills to produce magazine articles, or video/radio documentaries on health, science, and the environment. Other assignments include press releases, profiles, and memos. Lecture, videos, and field trips help to critique news, public relations, advertisements, PSAs, campaigns, film, television, music, and the internet on related issues.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Communication Studies majors only
    Typically Offered Not Recently Offered
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 324 - Scriptwriting for TV


    Unit(s): 4
    Course focuses on fundamentals of writing professional-level scripts for video, television, and film productions. Assignments include lab work and homework producing scripts and storyboards for Public Service Announcements (PSAs), commercials, news packages, documentaries, corporate and educational training programs, and dramatic screenplays.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 325 - New Media


    Unit(s): 4
    This course introduces students to new communication technology, its influence on society, and how to write for the new media environment. This course will focus on examining new communication technologies including the different ways in which these technologies are used, the theoretical models that are relevant to new communication technology as well as the practical applications and implications of new communication technology on communication.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 326 - Advanced Presentation Techniques


    Unit(s): 4
    Course involves intensive self-evaluation of both verbal and non-verbal elements of presentation. Interviews, group communications, and presenting with multimedia are covered. Theories of communication are discussed as they relate to presentation styles.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior-level standing required.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 328 - America at the Movies


    Unit(s): 4
    An examination of the sociopolitical meanings and significance of American film from the silent era to the present. To better understand how films can potentially reflect and affect society, students read about American history and analyze dozens of films in their particular historical contexts.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Communication Studies Juniors, Seniors and Graduates.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 329 - “Reality” TV and Film


    Unit(s): 4
    How is “reality” mediated in film and television? In this course students examine the truthfulness, ethics, and sociopolitical implications of such forms and genres as the documentary, neorealism, Dogme 95, tabloid talk shows, voyeurism/confession shows, crime shows, freak shows, and contest/game shows.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Communication Studies majors only
    Typically Offered Not Recently Offered
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 340 - Public Relations Firm


    Unit(s): 4
    This is a hands-on class for students who are planning to work in the field of public relations. The class is run as a public relations firm with students working as consultants with clients to develop plans and projects for public relations campaigns.

    Prerequisite(s): COMS 240. Open to Juniors, Seniors and Graduates only. Non major needs Dept. approval
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 368 - Newspaper Writing/Editing (STAR


    Unit(s): 4
    The faculty advisor offers a comprehensive evaluation – oral and written – of the most recent edition of the campus newspaper, the STAR. Instruction is provided on a wide variety of journalism topics, from editing and reporting to ethics and law. Students are required to read the STAR and the written evaluation by the advisor.

    Prerequisite(s): COMS 210.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for up to 12 units.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    COMS 369 - Studio Blue


    Unit(s): 4
    This is an essential class for students who will work in the Broadcasting Industry. Students will learn about the history, structure, and operations of local broadcasting. Students will be expected to work in a specific department of Studio Blue during the semester.

    Prerequisite(s): COMS 201 or COMS 369 or consent of instructor, and restricted to COMS majors only.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit up to 12 units.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    COMS 385 - Media Lab: Radio (KSUN


    Unit(s): 4
    A media lab to develop a range of skills in the production of radio programs. Work focuses on the production of live and prerecorded pieces for KSUN, SSU’s internet radio station (www.sonoma.edu/ksun ). The lab also serves as the staff meeting of the radio station.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for up to 12 units.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    COMS 402 - Senior Seminar


    Unit(s): 4
    Students will share at least one critical analysis of a specific media message and complete a senior-level project/portfolio/study, which is the culmination of their major experience.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Communication Studies Seniors or Graduates and completion of COMS 301 and 302 required.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated Cannot be repeated for credit.
    Teaching Mode: Course is taught Face to face during the semester and may also be offered Hybrid or Online during winter and summer session. Grading: GRD
  
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    COMS 435 - Seminar in Mass Media


    Unit(s): 4
    Seminar provides an opportunity to gain new insights into social problems through an intensive analysis of the role and impact of mass communication in contemporary society. Emphasis is on exploring, through a major research project, social issues that should be, but are not, fully covered by the mass media.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Communication Studies Majors. Crosslisted: SOCI 435
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    COMS 460 - Teaching Assistant in Communication Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Intended to give students experience assisting instructors. Teaching Assistants help teach, do research, and tutor students in classes. Consent of instructor and department contract required.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Communication Studies Majors.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    COMS 470 - Research Assistant in Communication Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Intended to give selected students experience in the construction and implementation of a professor’s research project. Consent of instructor and department contract required.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Communication Studies Majors.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    COMS 495 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Supervised study of a particular problem or area of interest in the media selected by the student in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member. Meetings will be arranged for discussions and progress evaluations.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit up to 8 units. Consent of instructor and Special Study 495 contract required.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    COMS 499 - Media Internship


    Unit(s): 1-4
    This class provides students with an opportunity to discover how to make an effective transition from the classroom to the workplace. For a semester, individuals work in a media firm, business, newspaper, radio, or TV station. On the job, students learn networking and negotiating skills. Assignments for class include: a resume, workplace lingo, self-evaluation, profile of supervisor, and album with photos and text that describe the experience. There is also an interview for a job. Seniors only. Consent of instructor, internship agreement form, and department contracts required. Can be taken for up to 12 units only.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Communication Studies Seniors and Graduate Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD

Counseling

  
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    COUN 494 - Counseling Experience


    Unit(s): 1
    Participation in personal counseling conducted by a graduate student in the counseling M.A. program under the direct supervision of a counseling department faculty member. Students generate a written evaluation of the counseling experience. Students compile a weekly journal and write a summary essay.

    Prerequisite(s): instructor consent.
    Typically Offered Spring Only May Be Repeated May be repeated once.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    COUN 496 - Migrant-Education Advisor Program


    Unit(s): 1-4
    School-based counseling experience supervised by Counseling department faculty. Under the guidance of the instructor, undergraduate students advise, counsel, and mentor K-12 students with a migrant background.

    Prerequisite(s): participation in the Migrant Education Advisor Program (MEAP) and consent of the instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: CNC
  
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    COUN 501 - Counseling Theories and Professional Orientation


    Unit(s): 4
    An orientation to professional counseling focusing on standards of practice, major counseling theories, and essential concepts in the practice of counseling including attention to concepts of resilience and recovery-based models. Advocacy, systems of care, services, support for the severely mentally ill, and collaborative treatment are addressed in both counseling and case management. Mental health principles, the history and philosophy of counseling, consultation, self-care, cultural competence, roles of professional organizations and governing bodies, and ethical standards of the discipline are presented. This course also includes focus on 1 unit of special topics toward the CA LPCC license.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 502 - Whole Lifespan Development


    Unit(s): 4
    This course offers a developmental perspective on counseling interventions appropriately undertaken with children, adolescents, and adults. Objectives include: 1) providing students with an introduction to basic intervention strategies for counseling children and adolescents, taking into account cultural and socio-economic influences; 2) familiarizing students with special topics, e.g., impact of divorce on children, child maltreatment, and effects of domestic violence; 3) consideration of family, peer, school, and community contexts in treatment planning (i.e., integrative case formulation) with children and adolescents; 4) identifying basic intervention strategies that facilitate adaptive change in adults’ lives, particularly in the context of significant transitions and life events; 5) addressing long term care and elder abuse; 6) consideration of gender, sexual orientation, and ethnicity issues; and (7) examination of changes in career, interpersonal relationships, family structure and dynamics with an emphasis on their interdependence. This course also incorporates focus on 1 unit of special topics toward the CA LPCC license. Course restricted to Counseling M.A. students only.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 503 - Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning


    Unit(s): 4
    A course designed to cover psychopathology and sociopolitical-related issues of diagnosis and treatment. Attention is given to: 1) understanding the variability of psychopathology in community counseling settings; 2) the application of evaluation methods and diagnostic classification systems of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental and Emotional Disorders (DSM); 3) development of appropriate treatment plans; 4) the relationship of class, gender, and ethnic background to diagnosis and treatment; 5) mental health recovery-oriented care; 6) principles of collaborative treatment; and 7) the impact of co-occurring disorders. This course also includes a focus on 1 unit of special topics toward the CA LPCC license. Course restricted to Counseling M.A. students only.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling M.A. students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Teaching Mode: Hybrid & Online
  
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    COUN 510A - Applied Counseling Techniques and Assessment


    Unit(s): 4
    This course helps students to develop necessary basic multiculturally competent assessment and counseling skills to prepare them for field based training experiences in a wide variety of settings. Students will learn interview and assessment methodologies including intake interviewing, crisis assessment, and suicide assessment. Training is done through the use of videotape feedback and in-class practice demonstrations involving personal disclosure, role-play, and group and instructor feedback. This course is normally taken in the first semester by new students. This course also includes focus on 2 units of special topics toward the California LPCC license. Course restricted to Counseling M.A. students only.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 510B - Applied Counseling Practicum and Advanced Techniques


    Unit(s): 4
    This course provides students with an opportunity to continue the development of multiculturally-competent counseling skills necessary for advanced field training during the COUN 514A/COUN 514B Supervised Field Experience sequence. There are different sections for CMHC (MFT & LPCC) and School Counseling (PPS) students: CMHC students see clients in a structured fashion on campus and School Counseling students work in school settings under the instructor’s supervision. This course also expands on principles of counseling clients in crisis and clients who have experienced trauma.

    Prerequisite(s): COUN 510A.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 511F - Career Counseling: Foundations, Measurement and Assessment, and Issues Throughout the Lifespan


    Unit(s): 3
    Counseling 511F focuses on academic and career awareness and support for individuals and families throughout the lifespan, including the following objectives: (1) coverage of learning and career development theory, system support, K-12 academic and career guidance, and career information resources; 2) overview of major theoretical career models and practice guidelines; 3) study of the impact of diversity issues and counselor personal needs/values on ultimate career and educational choices; 4) exploration of interrelationships among and between work, family, and other life roles and factors; 5) development of hands-on career assessment and interviewing skills including skills for group and individual clients; 6) skills with print and computer-based career counseling materials; 7) familiarizing students with available information resources; and 8) coverage of career issues of adult development, including job maintenance, advancement, retirement, job-loss, avocation and leisure, and secondary career status.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 511G - Academic and Career Planning and Counseling Issues of K-12 Populations


    Unit(s): 1
    COUN 511G is an introductory course in K-12 academic counseling and career development. Course content includes the foundations of learning theory, cradle to career development and academic guidance models, and print/internet based academic/career counseling materials. The course explores the impact of personal needs, values, cultural variables, aptitudes, abilities, and interests on academic progress and career/vocational choices.

    Typically Offered Summer Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 512 - Theory and Practice of Group Counseling


    Unit(s): 4
    This didactic and experiential course provides students with an introduction to the concepts and practices of group counseling, supplemented by lectures and readings. The dynamics and procedures involved in working with groups will be examined with students functioning as both group participants as well as group leaders. The course also examines basic group counseling skills, stages of group formation, confidentially, trust issues, co-counseling in groups, group dynamics and structure, groupwork with families, and groupwork from a systemic perspective. Cultural factors related to group work are identified didactically and experientially. Practical approaches to group counseling include psycho-educational groups, interpersonal problem-solving groups, and task/work groups, among others. This course also includes focus on 1 unit of special topics toward the CA LPCC license.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 513 - Research, Evaluation, and Assessment in Counseling


    Unit(s): 4
    A survey of the principles of research design, program evaluation, and assessment as applied to counseling in school and community settings, with a focus on using these skills to improve individual and programmatic counseling efficacy. Students will develop an understanding of key issues in assessment, including test development, administration and scoring, test reporting and interpretation, and test evaluation and selection. In addition, students will develop an understanding of research design and how it can be utilized for data-based counseling program planning and evaluation. The course will increase students’ awareness of the ethical and cultural dilemmas that are inherent in assessment, research, and evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 514A - School Counseling Supervised Field Experience I


    Unit(s): 4
    This seminar provides a group discussion and supervision format in conjunction with advanced field based training, in school settings. The class meetings are designed to supplement the individual and group supervision provided by site supervisors, and the goal of the seminar is to help students develop a model of professional functioning through the integration of theory, pragmatic strategies, and personal development. Aspects of cultural diversity that influence counseling practice in school settings will be addressed. Integral to this experience is the exchange of feedback and support among seminar participants. This course also addresses techniques for working with clients and situations involving crisis/trauma.

    Prerequisite(s): COUN 510A, 510B and 520. Course restricted to COUN MA students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 514B - School Counseling Supervised Field Experience II


    Unit(s): 4
    This seminar provides opportunities to build upon and consolidate the field based training skills addressed in COUN 514A. A group discussion and supervision format continues to provide supplemental support relative to counseling field work in school settings. The class meetings are designed to supplement the individual and group supervision received from site supervisors, and the goal of the seminar is to help students develop a model of professional functioning through the integration of theory, pragmatic strategies, and personal development. Aspects of cultural diversity that influence counseling practice in school settings will be addressed, along with working with clients in crisis, experiencing trauma, and how to respond as part of a crisis team. Students will complete a culminating case study project, with both oral and written components.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to COUN MA students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 515A - CMHC Supervised Field Experience I


    Unit(s): 4
    This seminar provides a group discussion and supervision format in conjunction with advanced field based training, which may be in community counseling settings (CMHC students). The class meetings are designed to supplement the individual and group supervision provided by site supervisors, and the goal of the seminar is to help students develop a model of professional functioning through the integration of theory, pragmatic strategies, and personal development. Aspects of cultural diversity that influence counseling practice in community and school settings will be addressed didactically and experientially. Integral to this experience is the exchange of feedback and support among seminar participants. This course also addresses techniques for working with clients and situations involving crisis/ trauma. Students will initiate a culminating case study project, with both oral and written components.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to COUN MA students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 515B - CMHC Supervised Field Experience II


    Unit(s): 4
    This course finalizes the CMHC sequence. Practicing fieldwork-focused group consultation, students develop a model of professional practice via integration of theory and skills. Students must complete a capstone written and oral case study, pass the CMHC Exit Exam, and receive satisfactory evaluations.

    Prerequisite(s): COUN 510A, COUN 510B, COUN 515A. Restricted to CMHC students.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 520 - Introduction to School Counseling


    Unit(s): 4
    This course provides a conceptual overview and orientation to the practice of school counseling. Emphasis will be placed on school counseling programs as critical components of the education enterprise, the ASCA national model of school counseling, and the expanding and changing role of the school counselor with respect to school climate, student and family issues.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 521 - Seminar: Pupil Personnel Services - Concepts and Organization


    Unit(s): 4
    A seminar in organizing, supervising, and administering comprehensive service-based and data-driven Pupil Personnel Programs in elementary and secondary schools; legal and financial aspects, as well as laws affecting children and child welfare are covered. Students learn how to create a developmental school counseling program that is an integral part of the entire educational program in a school.

    Prerequisite(s): COUN 520 and restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 523 - Working with Families in School Setting


    Unit(s): 4
    This course has as its focus a study of family systems and how they impact and interact with all the systems that involve the child including educational and cultural systems. Basic to this is the study of the pre-service school counselor’s own family of origin and its impact on their development as a student. Attention is devoted to important issues impacting families including family structures and lifecycle; domestic violence; poverty; and the roles of families and systems in substance abuse and dependence. Each student is required to take a leadership role in a field based parent involvement activity in a school setting as part of this course.

    Prerequisite(s): COUN 510A and restricted to Counseling MA students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 524 - Counseling Children and Adolescents


    Unit(s): 4
    This course provides an overview of the theories and techniques of child and adolescent counseling with a focus on youth development in a socio-cultural context. Counseling interventions used in schools and common concerns of school-aged students are emphasized (including substance abuse). Methods for establishing rapport, goal setting, and case formulation are highlighted. Special emphasis will be placed on applying theory to practice in a developmentally appropriate manner.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    COUN 526 - Group Counseling in the Schools


    Unit(s): 4
    This didactic and experimental course examines the concepts and practices unique to group counseling in the schools. Psycho-educational strategies in the school settings are emphasized. Particular attention is given to processes and challenges involved in the implementation of these strategies; cultural context, effectiveness, and evaluation issues will be explored. The dynamics and procedures involved in working with small and large groups will be studied with members as participants and as leaders.

    Prerequisite(s): COUN 510A (Pre-practicum) and COUN 520 and restricted to Counseling MA students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    COUN 527 - Law and Ethics for School Counselors


    Unit(s): 4
    This course examines the legal and ethical responsibilities of the school counselor. Course topics include: educational counseling, child abuse reporting, confidentiality, record keeping, and attendance and truancy laws. This course also provides an overview of special education law, including: the different federal categories of disability, Individualized Educational Program (IEP) procedures, suspension and expulsion of students with disabilities, and Section 504 Accommodation Plans.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    COUN 528A - Consultation


    Unit(s): 3
    This course provides a general framework for understanding and practicing culturally and contextually sensitive consultation, collaborative problem solving, and systems level intervention in educational settings. An exploration of the stages of consultation and the major models of consultation are covered. Students will gain experience in the delivery of consultation services.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    COUN 528B - Crisis Intervention


    Unit(s): 1
    This course focuses on prevention, response, and recovery during a crisis, and the counselor’s role as part of a school-based crisis intervention team. Crises include school violence, accidents, and the death or suicide of a student or faculty member. Maintaining the safety and security of the school community emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    COUN 540 - Counseling Diverse Couples and Families


    Unit(s): 4
    This course offers theoretical, principle, and methodological foundations for understanding diverse couple and family relationships by providing an overview of historical and contemporary models of conceptualization, assessment, and intervention. Attention is devoted to important legal, ethical, and clinical considerations unique to working with families and couples, including partner abuse assessment, intervention, and dynamics; child abuse reporting; and roles of families and systems in substance abuse and dependence. Throughout, cultural factors such as the role of poverty, sexual identity, blended families/step-parenting, and multiracial families are addressed. This course also includes focus on 3 units of special topics toward the CA LPCC license.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    COUN 545 - Counseling Orientation, Law and Ethics, and Case Management Practices


    Unit(s): 4
    This course is designed to clarify the legal and ethical responsibilities of the Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CMHC). Legal standards related to counseling practice will be surveyed, including issues related to dissolution; child care, custody, and abuse; confidentiality; involuntary hospitalization; mandatory reporting requirements; detection, assessment, and treatment of domestic violence; and other issues related to the relationship between law and counseling. Ethical standards, which often overlap with legal standards, will be surveyed. This course also addresses case management practices commonly employed by clinicians. Cultural considerations will be examined as they impact counseling and case management practices. This course satisfies the educational requirements for licensure as a Marriage and Family Therapist and as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in California. It also includes focus on 1 unit of special topics toward the CA LPCC license. Course restricted to Counseling M.A. students only.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    COUN 570 - Seminar Multicultural Counseling


    Unit(s): 4
    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how different forms of diversity (ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, disability, religion, and gender) can affect counseling processes. Students will identify and explore their own unique ethnic and cultural worldview and see how it affects their counseling approaches in both community and school counseling settings. Students will explore theories of multicultural counseling and development. Students will also become knowledgeable about various minority groups in California and in the United States and how majority culture influences the minority individuals’ daily lives and their responses to counseling. The seminar will address multicultural aspects of counseling children, youth, and adults including advocacy and use of culturally appropriate counseling modalities. This course includes focus on 4 units of special topics toward the CA LPCC license. Course restricted to Counseling M.A. students only.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    COUN 580 - Couples and Sexuality Counseling


    Unit(s): 4
    This course provides students with theoretically-based knowledge about and skills in conducting counseling for couples, including addressing sexuality issues. Assessment and counseling interventions covered will reflect the pluralistic needs of couples who are embedded in complex social systems (e.g., legal, health). Issues such as intimate partner violence, infertility, gender roles, and sexual function/dysfunction will be addressed, and cross-cultural considerations will be incorporated throughout all topics. Students will also have opportunities to explore their own world-views as they relate to coupling and sexuality, to increase their effectiveness with a diversity of clients. This course also includes 4 units of special topics and populations toward the California LPCC license.

    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    COUN 582 - Psychopharmacology for Counselors


    Unit(s): 3
    This didactic course explores basic principles and applications of psychopharmacology in the mental health field. Emphasis is paid to neurotransmitter systems in the nervous system, principles of drug action, and clinical pharmacology (the use of medications to treat behavioral, psychological, and psychiatric conditions such as eating disorders, depressive disorders, hyperactivity, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, and dementia). Attention will be paid to the community counselor’s role in the effective, multiculturally-competent, and ethical use of psycho-active medications (e.g., referral, consultation, monitoring) when psychopharmacological interventions are part of treatment as well as to the historical and sociopolitical contextual issues surrounding the prescription of psychiatric medication.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    COUN 583 - Substance Abuse and Dependence


    Unit(s): 2
    A didactic course designed to provide a broad conceptual base regarding major dimensions of alcohol and drug abuse and dependence disorders. The course explores theories of addiction; co-occurring disorders; and medical aspects, effects, and approaches to prevention, assessment, and treatment of alcohol and drug abuse/dependence disorders. The contextual role of the family and larger systems, including the legal system, are addressed. Risk factors, community resources, referral, and prevention information is discussed from developmental and cross-cultural perspectives.

    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    COUN 595 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    COUN 596 - Clinical Consultation Seminar


    Unit(s): 1-2
    This seminar will provide a group discussion and supervision format in conjunction with the pre-M.A. Field Experience/Traineeship. This seminar’s weekly small group meetings (max of 8 students) are designed to provide campus-based consultation surrounding the Pre-M.A. clinical Traineeship, using case presentation and group discussion. A key aim of the seminar is the development of a model of professional functioning through the integration of theoretical, practice and personal material. Integral to this experience is the exchange of feedback and support among group members. The course is designed to provide an opportunity for continuing evaluation of student growth and counseling efficacy. This component will include evaluation from faculty and site-supervisors, as well as students ongoing self-assessment. This course is designed to meet California Board of Behavioral Science requirements that allow Pre-M.A. Trainees to earn hours toward MFT licensure.

    Prerequisite(s): Course restricted to Counseling MA Students only.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: CNC

Computer Science

  
  •  

    CS 101 - Introduction to Computers and Computing


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 2 hours
    This course is an introduction to the concepts, techniques, uses, applications, and terminology of computers, computing, and networking. Emphasis is on the possibilities and limitations of computers and computing in a wide range of personal, commercial, and organizational activities. Topics include computer types, history of computing, computer organization and operation, computer languages, program development, computer applications (word processing, database, graphics, spreadsheets, etc.), basic networking, and computers in society. Weekly hands-on experience with a variety of operating systems, applications, and computer programming.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Recommended Recommended for all students.
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    CS 115 - Programming I


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 3 hours Laboratory: 3 hours
    This course gives an overview of computer organization; arithmetic and logical expressions, decision and iteration, simple I/O; subprograms; principles of good programming style, readability, documentation, structured programming concepts; top-down design and refinements; techniques of debugging and testing. Use of the above concepts will be implemented in a standard high-level programming language.

    Prerequisite(s): GE math and English eligibility, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    CS 115W - Programming I Workshop


    Unit(s): 1
    A workshop designed to be taken with CS 115. Exploration of programming concepts through problem solving in a group setting.

    Co-requisite(s): CS 115.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: CNC
  
  •  

    CS 210 - Introduction to Unix


    Unit(s): 1 Laboratory: 3 hours
    This course is an introduction to the use of Linux/Unix as a programming environment. Communicating with a Linux host, shells and shell commands, files and directories, Gnome desktop, jobs and processes, scripting, programming utilities (compiler, linker, debugger, make, hex dump, etc.).

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 115 and previous or concurrent enrollment in CS 215, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    CS 215 - Programming II


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 3 hours Laboratory: 3 hours
    This course is the sequel to CS 115. Topics include: pointers and dynamic allocation of storage, linked lists, an introduction to the object oriented programming (OOP) paradigm, classes and objects, encapsulation, member variables and member functions, inheritance and polymorphism, scoping, templates, iterators, and error handling techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 115 and previous or concurrent enrollment in CS 210, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    CS 242 - Discrete Structures for Computer Science


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 4 hours
    This course covers fundamental mathematical concepts blended with their applications in Computer Science. Topics include: sets, functions and relations, Boolean algebra, normal forms., Karnaugh map and other minimization techniques, predicate logic, formal and informal proof techniques, relational algebra, basic counting techniques, recurrence relations, and an introduction to graph theory.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 115 and MATH 161, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    CS 252 - Introduction to Computer Organization


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 3 hours Laboratory: 3 hours
    This course looks at the interface between computer hardware and software by introducing computer architecture and low-level programming. Topics to be covered include: data representations, digital logic, combinational and sequential circuits, computer system organization from the machine language point of view, and assembly language implementation of high-level constructs.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 215 and CS 242, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    CS 285 - Selected Topics in Computer Science


    Unit(s): 1-4
    This lower-division course may be repeated with different subject matter. Content will be indicated by the specific topic.

    Prerequisite(s): As indicated in the specific topic description or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated Course may be repeated with different subject matter. Content will be indicated by the specific topic.
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    CS 315 - Data Structures


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 3 hours Laboratory: 3 hours
    This course introduces the concept of the organization of data into different structures to support the efficient implementation of computer algorithms. The emphasis of the course is on the internal representation of the elementary and intermediate data structures, their time and space requirements, and their applications. A second component of the course is the study of more advanced features of object-oriented programming.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 210, CS 215, and CS 242, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
 

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