Dec 04, 2021  
2020-2021 General Catalog 
    
2020-2021 General Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Science

  
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    CS 330 - Introduction to Game Programming


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 2 hours
    This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of video game design and programming. Video games combine, in real-time, concepts in computer graphics, human-computer interaction, networking, artificial intelligence, computer aided instruction, computer architecture, and databases. This course introduces students to a variety of game engines and frameworks and explores artificially intelligent agents. Students will work as part of a team to create a complete description document for a computer game and implement a prototype of the game.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 315 or instructor consent.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 340 - Computer Security and Malware


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 2 hours
    Current methods for increasing security, protecting privacy, and guaranteeing degrees of confidentiality of computer records; ensuring computer installation safety; protecting software products; preventing and dealing with crime; value systems, ethics, and human factors affecting use and misuse of computers. Discussion of recent technical, legal, and sociopolitical issues influencing computer security problems, with an emphasis on malware.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 215 and CS 252, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 349 - Problem Solving in a Team Environment


    Unit(s): 1 Laboratory: 2 hours
    This course focuses on problem solving and program development in a team programming environment. Topics include: techniques for problem analysis and algorithm design, rapid implementation and pair programming methods, use of standard container classes and library functions. Different types of problems will be selected each semester. Students taking this course participate in regional and national programming competitions.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 315 or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 3 units can be applied to the Computer Science major.
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 351 - Computer Architecture


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 4 hours
    This course is the sequel to CS 252 and includes the following topics: instruction set design; stages of instruction execution: data, and control path design; pipelining; program optimization techniques; memory hierarchy; cache models and design issues; virtual memory and secondary storage; I/O interfacing. Advanced topics to include some of the following: parallel architectures, DSP or other special purpose architecture, FPGA, reconfigurable architecture, and asynchronous circuit design.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 215 and CS 252, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 355 - Database Management Systems Design


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 4 hours
    This course focuses on the theoretical as well as the practical aspects of modern database systems.Topics include the study of the entity-relationship (E/R) model, relational algebra, data normalization, XML as a semi-structured data model, data integrity, and database administration. Current tools and technologies are used to create and manipulate sample databases.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 215 or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 360 - Object-Oriented Programming


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 3 hours
    Principles of object-oriented programming, including encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Specific applications are developed in one or more object-oriented programming languages and will cover the use of application frameworks and graphical user interfaces based on object-oriented principles.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 315, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 365 - Computer Networking and the Internet


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 3 hours
    This course introduces the theory and practice of computer networking, with coverage of key theories in data communication and how these theories relate to current practices and will drive future practices. Network hardware implementations of local area networks, wide area networks, telephone networks, and wireless networks are investigated. Network software implementations of switches and routers, peer-to-peer networking, and hosted applications are investigated with exercises in writing and debugging network protocols in the laboratory.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 215 and CS 252, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 370 - Software Design and Development


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 4 hours
    Techniques of software design and development. Software lifecycle, requirements, formal specification, metrics, design, functional and structural testing, rapid prototyping, complexity, version control, and team management. Software metrics, tools for component-based software development. Team-based, agile, and scrum methodologies emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 215 or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 375 - Computer Graphics


    Unit(s): 3
    An introduction to computer graphics. Survey of the fundamental algorithms and methodologies, including, but not limited to, polygon fill, line-drawing, antialiasing, geometric transformations, viewing and clipping, spline representation, occlusion and visible surface detection, illumination, texturing, color models, rendering, shaders, animation, and emerging techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 215 and MATH 161, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 380 - ETS Major Field Test


    Unit(s): 1
    The focus of this course is preparation for the Major Field Test in Computer Science. Students will review material in the basic knowledge areas of computer science including: discrete structures, programming, algorithms and complexity, systems, software engineering, and information management. The course will culminate with students taking the Major Field Test in Computer Science administered through Educational Testing Services. This course is intended for students whom have completed the majority of required coursework in the CS major and are within one semester of graduation.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: CNC
  
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    CS 385 - Selected Topics in Computer Science


    Unit(s): 1-4
    This course may be repeated with different subject matter for credit in the CS major.

    Prerequisite(s): As indicated in the specific topic description or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated Course may be repeated with different subject matter for credit in the CS major.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    CS 386 - Selected Topics in CS with Lab


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 3 hours
    This course may be repeated with different subject matter for credit in the CS major.

    Prerequisite(s): As indicated in the specific topic description or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated Course may be repeated with different subject matter for credit in the CS major.
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 390 - Computer Science Colloquium


    Unit(s): 1
    Series of lectures on current developments in computer science.

    May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit; a maximum of 3 units can be applied to the CS major; students will be required to attend all presentations, take notes, and research each of these presentations. Contact the department for specific information.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    CS 415 - Algorithm Analysis


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 4 hours
    This course provides a systematic approach to the design and analysis of algorithms with an emphasis on efficiency. Topics include algorithms for searching and sorting, hashing, exploring graphs, and integer and polynomial arithmetic. Foundations in recurrence relations, combinatorics, probability, and graph theory as used in algorithm analysis are covered. Standard design techniques such as divide-and-conquer, greedy method, dynamic programming, heuristics, and probabilistic algorithms along with NP-completeness and approximation algorithms are included.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 315, or consent of instructor.
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 425 - Parallel Computing


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    Overview of parallel patterns, programming models, and hardware. Topics include parallel performance analysis; types of parallelism; parallel decomposition of tasks; shared vs. distributed memory; synchronization; hands-on experience with multiple parallel programming models; and architectural support for parallelism.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 252 and CS 315, or consent of instructor.
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 450 - Operating Systems


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 4 hours
    This course covers the fundamental concepts of operating system design and implementation; the study of problems, goals, and methods of concurrent programming; and the fundamentals of systems programming. Topics include resource-management, process and thread scheduling algorithms, inter-process communication, I/O subsystems and device-drivers, memory management including virtual memory, segmentation, and page-replacement policies. These topics will be covered in theory and in practice through the study of the source-code of a working operating system.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 252 and CS 315, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 452 - Compiler Design and Construction


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 2 hours
    Application of language and automata theory to the design and construction of compilers. Lexical scanning, top-down and bottom-up parsing; semantic analysis, code generation; optimization. Design and construction of parts of a simple compiler using compiler generation tools.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 315 and CS 252, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 454 - Theory of Computation


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 4 hours
    Overview of various kinds of computability, unsolvability, and decidability. The P versus NP problem. Abstract mathematical models of computing devices and language specification systems with focus on regular and context-free languages. Classification of computer-solvable problems.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of Cor better in CS 315, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 460 - Programming Languages


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 4 hours
    This course provides a survey of the syntactic, semantic, and implementation features of functional, procedural, object-oriented, logic, and concurrent programming languages.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 252 and CS 315, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 465 - Data Communications


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 3 hours
    The ISO reference model, theoretical basis for data communications, data transmission theory and practice, telephone systems, protocols, networks, internetworks, with examples.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 365, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 470 - Advanced Software Design Project


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    This course is a project-based course designed to provide a “real world, team oriented” capstone experience for Computer Science majors. Coursework will be organized around large programming projects. The content of the projects may vary depending on the interests of the instructor and may include industry, government, nonprofit organization, or other affiliations.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 315, CS 370, and senior-standing in the major; or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 480 - Artificial Intelligence


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    This course is a survey of techniques that simulate human intelligence. Topics may include: pattern recognition, general problem solving, adversarial game-tree search, decision-making, expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy logic, and genetic algorithms.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in CS 315 or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 495 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    This course is intended for students who are doing advanced work in an area of computer science (e.g., a senior project).

    Prerequisite(s): an upper-division CS course in the area of interest and consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    CS 496 - Senior Research Project


    Unit(s): 3
    Students, under the direction of one or more faculty members, undertake a substantial research project that is based on multiple upper-division CS courses. The result of the research is presented by the students in one of the Colloquium (CS 390) meetings.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and consent of instructor
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    CS 497 - Internship


    Unit(s): 1-3
    Student projects conceived and designed in conjunction with an off-campus organization or group. The internship is intended to provide on-the-job experience in an area of computer science in which the student has no prior on-the-job experience. Computer hardware or computer time Required for the internship, as well as regular supervision of the intern, must be provided by the off-campus organization.

    Prerequisite(s): student must be within 30 units of completion of the CS major.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated Course may be repeated for credit.
    Grading: CNC

Economics

  
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    ECON 204 - Introduction to Macroeconomics


    Unit(s): 4
    An examination of the basic characteristics of the American economy and the principles that determine its performance. Emphasis is given to those factors that determine the levels of production, employment, prices, interest rates, and inflation.

    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area D5 (Contemporary International Perspectives).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face, Hybrid & Online. Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 205 - Introduction to Microeconomics


    Unit(s): 4
    An examination of the basic principles that determine the behavior of individual consumers and firms in the United States economy as they respond to changing economic conditions. Topics include demand, supply, pricing, production, cost, competition, and industrial structure. This course may be taken before ECON 204.

    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area D1 (Individual and Society).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face, Hybrid & Online. Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 217 - Statistics for Economics and Business


    Unit(s): 4
    Microsoft Excel based statistics. Topics include the collection and presentation of data, discrete and continuous distributions, probability and sampling theory, statistical inference and hypothesis testing. Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests will be examined, including t-tests, Chi-square, and ANOVA. Additional topics include regression, time series analysis and applications in business forecasting.

    Prerequisite(s): Students need to be GE Math ready to register for this course.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 303 - International Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    A study of issues, theories, and policies regarding international trade and finances, international movements of capital and labor, economic development, external debt, and foreign aid.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 204 and ECON 205 or in RBE1 group required.+
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 304 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory


    Unit(s): 4
    A study of economic theories that explain the levels and fluctuations in production, employment, income, money, and prices in an economic system, with an emphasis on the macroeconomic framework of the U.S. economy. Topics include national income accounting, models of short-run equilibrium and long-run growth, macroeconomic aspects of international economics, labor markets, monetary policy, and fiscal policy.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 204 and ECON 205 or in RBE1 group, and MATH 165 or MATH 165B or BUS 211 or ECON 217 or equivalent required or in RBE2 group.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 305 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory


    Unit(s): 4
    A study of theories that explain consumer behavior and managerial decision-making in organizations and firms in the economy. Deals with theories of demand, pricing, production, cost analysis, and competition.

    Prerequisite(s): ((ECON 204 and ECON 205 or in RBE1 group)and MATH 165 or BUS 211 or ECON 217) required or in RBE2 group.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 311 - Public Economy


    Unit(s): 4
    A basic introduction to the economics of the public sector designed to give the student a broad overview of the economic roles of government in our society. Emphasis will be on understanding current public policy issues and the effects of government policies on resource allocation (efficiency) and income distribution (equity).

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 205 and ECON 317 or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 313 - Economics of European Integration


    Unit(s): 4
    An introduction to the economics of Europe, and by implication, to the economic functions of the institutions of the European Union (EU). Students are introduced to economic policy issues which are currently of concern in the European Union, and the analysis of economic problems which are of particular relevance to European Union member states. These include (but are not limited to) the theory of customs unions, optimal currency area theory, the single market, competition policy, and the external trade and development policies of the EU.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 317 - Introduction to Econometrics


    Unit(s): 4
    Statistical techniques, based on linear regression, most frequently employed in economics. Topics include multiple regression, Gauss-Markov Theorem and its violations, cross-sectional techniques, time series analysis, simultaneous equation modeling, and forecasting. Applying widely-used computer programs to economic phenomena is emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): ((ECON 204 and ECON 205 or in RBE1 group)and MATH 165 or BUS 211 or ECON 217) required or in RBE2 group.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 319 - Managerial Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    Economic analysis applied to the management decisions of public or private firms. The course is oriented to case studies that illuminate the content and applicability of such basic economic concepts as marginality, opportunity costs, and market structure. Topics include: demand analysis, resource allocation, production economics, and cost analysis; profitability analysis; price and nonprice competition; capital budgeting; and long-range strategy formulation.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 305 and ECON 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 321 - Labor Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    A study of economic and social issues in U.S. labor markets. Topics will include U.S. labor history, market structure, labor laws, gender and race, education and training, and collective bargaining.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 205.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 322 - Urban Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    An exploration of issues facing communities and regions in their attempts to manage growth and enhance the quality of life. Microeconomic tools are applied in a spatial context to solve problems associated with land use, firm location, transportation, housing, congestion, open space, and environmental protection.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 204 and ECON 205 or RBE1 group.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 330 - Game Theory


    Unit(s): 4
    Analytical approach to studying rational behavior in interactive situations. This course develops basic theory, including Nash equilibrium, mixed strategies, credibility, coalitional games, and the core. Applications may include public goods, voting, auction design, bargaining, and the competitive market mechanism.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 204 and ECON 205 or in RBE1 group, and MATH 165 or MATH 165B or BUS 211 or ECON 217 or equivalent required or in RBE2 group.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 375 - Money and Banking


    Unit(s): 4
    An examination of financial institutions, monetary theory, and the rapidly changing domestic and international banking system. Topics will include alternative theories of monetary policy, the determination of interest rates and price levels, and the influence of financial institutions on inflation, recession, and growth.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 204 and ECON 205 or in RBE1 group required.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 381 - Natural Resource and Environmental Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    A study of public and private sector strategies for achieving the optimal use of natural resources and the control of pollution. Topics include: energy, water, minerals, forests, air pollution, climate change, and the valuation of environmental benefit and costs.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 204 and ECON 205 or in RBE1 group required.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 403A - Seminar in International Economic Development


    Unit(s): 4
    Review of current issues and study of conceptual frameworks for thinking about economic development with a global perspective. Focuses on sources of economic growth, poverty alleviation, resource sustainability, and reform of economic institutions in Latin America, Africa, Asia, and ex-socialist economies.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 303, 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 403B - Seminar in International Trade


    Unit(s): 4
    This course covers international trade, foreign direct investment, and immigration. Topics include international trade under imperfect competition and policies to regulate international trade. Vertical and horizontal foreign direct investment models and the relationships among direct foreign investment, immigration, and international trade will be examined.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 303, 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 403C - Seminar in International Finance


    Unit(s): 4
    The goal of this course is to explain movements in the trade balance, exchange rates, national output, and inflation. The first portion of the course develops building blocks regarding these movements. The second part of the course develops a theoretical framework which we will use to analyze policy issues such as the sustainability of the U.S. trade deficit, the Asian currency crisis, the Argentine crisis, the European Monetary Union and the Euro, the debt crisis, the international monetary system, and capital market integration.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 303, 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 404 - Seminar in Macroeconomic Theory


    Unit(s): 4
    A study of theories dealing with inflation, unemployment, macro-economic policies, equilibrium, and disequilibrium. Topics may include: investment, growth theory, monetary theory, international trade, aggregate demand and supply, comparative statics, post-Keynesian economics, and recent theoretical developments and policy issues.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 304, 305, and 317
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 405 - Seminar in Microeconomic Theory


    Unit(s): 4
    This course is devoted to explorations of economic theory and policy issues and is designed to deepen student understanding of economic theory learned in ECON 305.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 304, 305, and 317
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 408 - Seminar in Math Applications in Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    Applications of mathematical techniques in economics. Construction of micro- and macroeconomic models using calculus and linear algebra. Topics include: optimization, competition, supply and demand, national income, growth theory, general equilibrium, disequilibrium, and dynamics.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 304, 305 and 317 and MATH 161 or 161B.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Recommended Recommended for students considering graduate study in economics or business.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 411 - Seminar in Public Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    Applications of economic theory to public project analysis for students seeking careers in the public sector. Topics include: resource allocation, modeling and simulation, decision theory, fiscal impact analysis, benefit-cost analysis, government investment criteria, and project evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 417 - Seminar in Econometrics and Forecasting


    Unit(s): 4
    This course is devoted to explorations of statistical applications and theory used to analyze economic phenomena and is designed to deepen the student’s understanding of econometric and forecasting techniques learned at a basic level in ECON 317.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 419 - Seminar in Managerial Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    An exploration of the problems facing American firms in competing in a global economy. Topics include: product markets, production efficiency, technology, competitive markets, generic industry environments, and competitive strategies. Students will write and present case studies of firms and industries.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 304, 305, 317
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 421 - Seminar in Labor Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    An analysis of the theory of labor supply and demand. Topics include: wage determination and the theory of human capital, labor force participation, antipoverty programs, the causes and consequences of wage inequality, theories of race and gender discrimination, the role and effects of labor unions, and the effects of the minimum wage on employment and income.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 304, 305, 317
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 426 - Seminar in History of Economic Thought


    Unit(s): 4
    The interaction of economic thought, economic policy, and political ideology from mercantilism to the present day. The works of Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Marx, Marshall, Keynes, and the post-Keynesians are discussed in the context of the economic problems of their times.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 204 and 205 or in RBE1 group.
    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area D5 (Contemporary International Perspectives).
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face, Hybrid & Online. Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 440 - Seminar in Industrial Organization


    Unit(s): 4
    Economists understand firm behavior by applying a simple rule for profit maximization: Marginal Revenue equals Marginal Cost. Models of perfect competition and monopoly are the simplest applications of this rule, but fail to explain many of the things firms do in real markets. Industrial Organization (IO) is motivated by observed deviations from the classical models of perfect competition and monopoly. Topics include models of price discrimination, product differentiation, oligopoly, entry deterrence, collusion, etc. in order to understand how different market institutions lead to different restatements of the profit maximization rule.

    Prerequisite(s): 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 447 - Seminar in Gender and Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    The course explores feminist and neoclassical economic contributions to gender analysis. The main focus will be on work, development, and globalization. Topics explored in depth will include the environment, the family, and methodological issues. The diversity of women’s experience, due to their differing racial, class, geographical, and cultural positions will also be emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 449 - Seminar in Program Evaluation


    Unit(s): 4
    This class aims to teach students to apply and interpret the counterfactual model and associated methods in answering policy-relevant questions. The primary focus will be on study design: identifying causal questions and variables of interest, how the question would be answered, necessary assumptions, and potential sources of bias.

    Prerequisite(s): 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 454 - Seminar in Behavioral and Experimental Economics


    Unit(s): 4
    Economics is the study of how people make choices in a world with constraints. In Neoclassical models, behavior is based on assumptions that may or may not be true. Behavioral economics, on the other hand, takes as its starting point actual behavior (observed either experimentally or in naturally occurring situations), using observations to incorporate more realistic psychological foundations. Typically this means enriching the theory rather than replacing it. Experimental methods are particularly useful in this kind of research.

    Prerequisite(s): 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 461 - Seminar in Quantitative Marketing: Limited Dependent Variables


    Unit(s): 4
    This course covers quantitative methods in marketing research. In the course we analyze data on topics relevant to marketing such as pricing, promotion, branding and purchasing behavior. The course will make extensive use of advanced econometrics methods beginning with the multiple regression model and covering binary dependent variable models, unordered and ordered multinomial dependent variable models, limited dependent variable models and duration dependent variable models.

    Prerequisite(s): 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 462 - Seminar in Quantitative Marketing: Time Series Econometrics


    Unit(s): 4
    This course covers quantitative methods in marketing analytics. The course will concentrate on theory and application of time series econometrics to marketing topics such as pricing, promotion, branding and marketing return on investment. The course will make extensive use of advanced time series econometrics methods beginning with the multiple regression model.

    Prerequisite(s): 304, 305 and 317.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 494 - Special Topics in Economics


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Course of lectures on a single topic or set of related topics not ordinarily covered in the economics curriculum.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of the instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit with a different topic.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 495 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Open to economics majors only.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of the instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated once for credit.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    ECON 496 - Tutoring Economics


    Unit(s): 2
    Intended for advanced students working as tutors in Economics courses.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: CNC
  
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    ECON 497 - Seminar in Teaching Economics


    Unit(s): 2
    A faculty-directed seminar in teaching methods and concepts for students tutoring in economics.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated up to 8 times for credit.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    ECON 499 - Internship


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated twice for credit.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    ECON 501 - Foundations of Economics


    Unit(s): 2-3
    This introductory course will focus on using economic models for business decisions. The course will cover the fundamental components of profit maximization as well as macroeconomic analysis and the underlying variables that determine the performance of the economy. Statistical methods

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Graduate Students only
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    ECON 595 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Independent study designed in consultation with instructor. Subject matter variable. Students must complete the standard SSU form.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD

Education

  
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    EDUC 150 - Prospective Teachers


    Unit(s): 3
    Focuses on realities of the classroom from the teacher’s point of view. Includes child development, teachers’ roles and responsibilities, and the culture of schools in a changing society. Includes an apprenticeship with a teacher.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 250 - Teaching in a Changing World


    Unit(s): 3
    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the classroom from teachers’ points of view. Areas of content include child and adolescent development, teachers’ roles and responsibilities, the culture of schools in a changing society, as well as an apprenticeship with a practicing teacher. Particular emphasis will be on teacher decision-making. Institutional changes that could improve teacher and student performance will also be explored. Each student will spend 30 hours observing and participating in an assigned public school classroom.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 295 - Community Involvement Program


    Unit(s): 1-4
    CIP involves students in the community, performing such tasks as tutoring. Students receive 1 to 4 units, depending on the specific tasks performed. A total of 6 units of CIP credit may be applied toward a degree. Forty five hours of fieldwork is mandatory per unit.

    Prerequisite(s): Recommend to have EDUC 250 as prerequisite, but not required.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    EDUC 390 - Selected Topics in Education


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit under different topic.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    EDUC 417 - School and Society


    Unit(s): 3
    A critical examination of current issues in today’s schools and future directions in education through the perspectives of history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and the politics of education. Content includes: trends, movements, and issues of the development of our present-day school systems and current educational practice; development of an individual philosophy of education through examination and evaluation of educational philosophies from early Greek through modern/post-modern thought; analysis of American society and its effect on the functioning of schools; the role of explicit and implicit cultural assumptions in educational contexts; and the influence of federal, state, and local governing agencies, the knowledge industry, and special-interest groups on education.

    GE Category: Satisfies GE, Area D1 (Individual and Society). Restricted to: juniors, seniors CRED, CREDC, CREDP, CRED2, plan of EDUC-MA and to credential student group (RUCR).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 490 - Selected Topics in Education


    Unit(s): 1-4
    A course designed according to the interest of a particular faculty member, providing opportunities for diversification in content and reading.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit under different topic.
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 495 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit up to 8 units.
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 501 - Teacher Induction and Support: Inquiry


    Unit(s): 3
    EDUC 501 is one of two courses in the Sonoma State Teacher Induction and Support Program. This course is intended to meet the needs of teacher candidates who hold a preliminary single subject, multiple subject or education specialist credential and need to clear this credential through an Induction program.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to CREDC or CRED2 or MA plus CREDC/CRED2 only.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated Course repeatable for credit.
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face & Online. Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 504 - Teacher Induction and Support: Reflective Practice


    Unit(s): 3
    EDUC 504 is one of two courses in the Sonoma State Teacher Induction and Support Program. This course is intended to meet the needs of teacher candidates who hold a preliminary single subject, multiple subject or education specialist credential and need to clear this credential through an Induction program.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to CREDC or CRED2 or MA plus CREDC/CRED2 only.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated Course repeatable for credit.
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face & Online. Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 570 - The Reflective Educator


    Unit(s): 3
    Students should take this course at the beginning of the M.A. program. The focus of this course is on philosophical, historical, social, and psychological perspectives in education. Students will examine these perspectives while being encouraged to examine and reflect upon their own professional practices in education. In this course, students will have assignments that can be part of a reflective portfolio that they will continue to modify throughout their M.A. program. The portfolio is intended to be cumulative throughout the graduate core courses.

    Prerequisite(s): admission to M.A. in Education Program.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 571 - Research Paradigms in Education


    Unit(s): 3
    This course is designed to be taken midway in the Master of Arts degree program. This course focuses on becoming a critical consumer of research and includes among its goals the development of skills in the analysis and critique of educational research. The course serves to acquaint students with basic principles and techniques of educational research. It also provides students with an opportunity to integrate knowledge of these principles through analyses of action research projects that may serve as the foundation for the culminating master of arts degree project.

    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 570 or other MA courses.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 572 - Supervised Study for Cognate Project


    Unit(s): 3
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: CNC
  
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    EDUC 573 - Supervised Study: Individual Exam


    Unit(s): 3
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: CNC
  
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    EDUC 578 - Project Continuation


    Unit(s): 1-3
    Designed for students working on their thesis or master’s project but who have otherwise completed all graduate coursework toward their degree. This course cannot be applied toward the minimum number of units needed for completion of the master’s degree.

    Prerequisite(s): permission of the graduate coordinator.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: CNC
  
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    EDUC 588 - Educational Curriculum


    Unit(s): 3
    Typically Offered Not Recently Offered
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 595 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Independent study designed in consultation with an instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): students must complete the standard SSU form and secure the required approvals during the first week of classes.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 598 - Developing a Thesis/Project


    Unit(s): 3
    This is the final course in the graduate core courses in Education. This course develops students’ abilities to carry out a thesis or project and provides basic information for planning and implementing the master of arts degree proposal. The main goal is to provide students with knowledge to begin their thesis or project. Time is provided for students to assess progress in the program and to complete portfolio development.

    Prerequisite(s): completion of all M.A. coursework or taken in final semester of M.A. coursework.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDUC 599 - Supervised Research for Thesis/Project


    Unit(s): 3
    Supervised Research provides students with guidance in the completion of their research project. Under the direction of the committee chair, and in consultation with all committee members, students will complete the thesis or project that was developed in EDUC 598 Developing a Thesis/Project. Following completion of the research project, students will participate in a formal presentation of their work to faculty and colleagues.

    Prerequisite(s): completion of EDUC 598. Advancement to candidacy approved.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: CNC

Education: Curriculum and Teaching

  
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    EDCT 544 - Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning in the Content Areas


    Unit(s): 3
    Examination of curriculum, teaching, and learning in the context of a particular content area as taught in K-12 schools. This course extends and applies the more general theories, practices, and research in curriculum, teaching, and learning established in EDCT 585 and EDCT 586. Intended for students in the appropriate Subject Area Cohort Track in the Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning M.A. program.

    Prerequisite(s): EDCT 585 and EDCT 586. Open to grad students only.
    Typically Offered Not Recently Offered
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDCT 552 - Educational Technology Praxis


    Unit(s): 3
    Educational Technology Praxis requires students to take a reflexive stance towards the initiation and integration of technological skills and knowledge in authentic instructional contexts and settings. The practical application of technology will be grounded within current perspectives and trends of new media technologies and take into account educational frameworks of learning, design, and pedagogical practice.

    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDCT 556 - Technology, Pedagogy, and Society


    Unit(s): 3
    This course relates pedagogical theories to technology integration strategies at various levels of education. The content is focused on how technology and learning are situated, how socio-cultural issues relate to and influence technological access and use, and power and privilege. Age, gender, race/ethnicity, social class, sexual orientation, language, and social capital and its intersections will also be analyzed.

    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDCT 557 - Project Management for Educational Technology


    Unit(s): 3
    This course considers how a small-scale Educational Technology research project can be conducted in an education environment. Case studies will be reviewed to offer practical tools and applied research strategies to students prior to conducting their own Educational Technology thesis or cognate project.

    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDCT 559 - Educational Media and Information Literacy


    Unit(s): 3
    This course focuses on critical media and information literacy and issues related to researching, creating, and evaluating media in the Internet and Information Age. The course also highlights the origins and threads of cultural studies, media education, and digital literacy in an effort to better map and analyze both the field of digital media and learning and the evolution of digital participation and citizenship.

    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDCT 560 - Instructional Design and Technology


    Unit(s): 3
    Instructional Design and Technology is a practical course that offers participants training in advanced instructional design methods and relates these to learning theories and pedagogical practices introduced in other Educational Technology courses. Advanced techniques will concentrate on evaluating and using a range of interactive instructional design authoring tools.

    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDCT 562 - Educational Technology Mentorship


    Unit(s): 3
    Students will apply educational technology theory and methods through mentorship experiences. Such experiences may include working in the School of Education, Faculty Center, University Library, as well as with public or private partners in an educational or training capacity that utilizes technology. Mentorships require faculty approval, and a minimum of 45 hours of work per unit per semester, including regular consultation with, and evaluation by, the faculty sponsor.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    EDCT 585 - Curriculum Development: Theory, Practice, and Evaluation


    Unit(s): 3
    Analyses of sociopolitical, economic, and cultural influences on curriculum development, instructional processes, and learner achievement in a variety of instructional settings. Study of the structures of various disciplines, the roles of participants, and other variables in staff and curriculum development. Evaluation of alternative theoretical models for constructing and changing curricula.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and approval of the School of Education.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDCT 586 - Teaching and Learning: Research and Application-Classroom


    Unit(s): 3
    An analysis of teaching and learning strategies and instructional variables as they relate to diverse groups of learners. Research will be analyzed in terms of the major paradigms of the field of education. Also included is a review of recent developments in the evaluation of classroom performance and achievement.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and approval of the School of Education.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDCT 595 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD

Education: Early Childhood Education

  
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    EDEC 110 - Understanding Development: Birth through Adolescence


    Unit(s): 3
    Are 2-year-olds really terrible? Is it inevitable that teens and parents argue continuously? Students will study child development research and theory to understand different factors that affect cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development from birth through adolescence. Students will reflect upon their own childhoods and consider applications to the lives of children from diverse backgrounds. This course is a pre-requisite to EDEC 220 and 270.

    GE Category: E - Life Long learning & Self Development
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated No
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face, Hybrid & Online Grading: Graded
  
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    EDEC 160A - Social Justice in Childhood and Adolescence


    Unit(s): 4
    In this first year learning community, students study how inequality and privilege affect the identities, learning, and development of children and adolescents. Through analysis of children’s literature, current social issues, and their own experiences, students apply social justice theory to authentic examples of inequality. Students also participate in transition curriculum designed to build college and leadership skills.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to First Year students only.
    GE Category: A passing grade in the fall semester fulfills 3 units of GE Area A3 (Oral Communication); a grade of C- or better in the spring semester fulfills 3 units of GE Area A3 (critical thinking).
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDEC 160B - Social Justice in Childhood and Adolescence


    Unit(s): 4
    In this first year learning community, students study how inequality and privilege affect the identities, learning, and development of children and adolescents. Through analysis of children’s literature, current social issues, and their own experiences, students apply social justice theory to authentic examples of inequality. Students also participate in transition curriculum designed to build college and leadership skills. Open to First Year students only.

    Prerequisite(s): EDEC 160A required
    GE Category: A passing grade in the fall semester fulfills 3 units of GE Area A3 (Oral Communication); a grade of C- or better in the spring semester fulfills 3 units of GE Area A3 (critical thinking).
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    EDEC 178 - Introduction to ECS Major and Digital Portfolio


    Unit(s): 1
    In this course students learn about the requirements and responsibilities of the Early Childhood Studies (ECS) major, and learn about ethical and legal requirements in field placements and professional life. They will understand the purpose of the senior portfolio in the ECS major, learn about different types of portfolios, and practice building a digital portfolio.

    Prerequisite(s): Declared ECS major
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated No
    Grading: CNC
  
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    EDEC 201 - Foundations of Early Care and Education


    Unit(s): 4
    This course provides an introduction to the theory and research that underlie professional work with young children. Topics include: historical views on childhood and play, influential theorists, historical and contemporary models of early childhood education, principles of developmentally and culturally appropriate practice, contemporary issues in early care and education, professional ethics, and professional career development.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    EDEC 220 - Child Observation with Field Experience


    Unit(s): 4
    Students will learn the major developmental milestones, research findings, and theories covering the social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development of children from conception through eight years old. Students will concurrently study observation techniques for documenting and assessing children’s growth and development. Includes 24 hours of field work in an Early Childhood setting. Students must sign the School of Education Field Experience Agreement before starting at their field site.

    Prerequisite(s): EDEC 178, and open to sophomores and above.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated No
    Teaching Mode: Face to Face & Hybrid Grading: Graded
  
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    EDEC 237 - Early Childhood Curriculum with Field Experience


    Unit(s): 4
    This course presents an overview of knowledge and skills related to planning and implementing developmentally and culturally appropriate curriculum and environments for young children from birth to eight years old. Students examine how to create and use the physical environment as the foundation for promoting activities that support learning and development, with an emphasis on language and literacy development and the essential role of play. Includes 24 hours of field work in an infant/toddler, preschool, transitional kindergarten, or kindergarten classroom that has been approved by the instructor. Students must sign the School of Education Field Experience Agreement before starting at their field site. Course open to sophomores and above.

    Prerequisite(s): EDEC 220.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated No
    Teaching Mode: Face to Face & Hybrid Grading: Graded
  
  •  

    EDEC 247 - Physical Development and Health in Childhood


    Unit(s): 3
    In this course, students will study the factors that promote optimal physical development and health in childhood. Students will consider practical applications of this knowledge in a variety of organizations that serve young children. Students will also study the basics of parent education, so that they can work effectively with parents to keep children safe and to see that children receive needed health services.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to ECS majors only.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
 

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