Oct 24, 2021  
2020-2021 General Catalog 
    
2020-2021 General Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Geology

  
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    GEOL 390 - Geology Colloquium


    Unit(s): 1.00
    Presentation and discussion of current topics in geology by visiting lecturers, staff, and students. Students will prepare written summaries of the approximately bi-weekly presentations. During the non-presentation weeks, students will meet to discuss papers associated with upcoming speakers. May be repeated for credit; a maximum of 2 units can be applied to a Geology major or minor.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: CNC
  
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    GEOL 395 - Community Involvement Program


    Unit(s): 1-4
    CIP involves students in community problems such as tutoring, aiding in school science classes, and advisement of county agencies. A total of 6 units of CIP credit may be applied toward a degree. May be taken by petition only.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: CNC
  
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    GEOL 396 - Internship in Geology


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Professional geologic work for a geologic firm or agency. Forty-five hours of work per unit.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 303 and consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: CNC
  
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    GEOL 406 - X-ray Mineralogy


    Unit(s): 2 Lecture: 1 hour Laboratory: 3 hours
    Introduction to the use of x-ray diffraction techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115A and GEOL 205 or concurrent enrollment, and consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Not Recently Offered
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEOL 420 - Integrative Field Experience


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 2 hours
    This course is a synthesis of the Geology major core courses. This course aims to hone our students’ abilities to make valid geologic field interpretations through detailed field mapping and report writing. Twelve days of fieldwork are required.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 308, GEOL 309, GEOL 312, and GEOL 318. Students must be in good physical condition.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEOL 422 - Geochemistry


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    Introductory cosmochemistry and origin of the elements; meteorites; the Earth as a chemical system, chemistry of processes at the surface of the Earth; mineral crystal chemistry; introduction to geochronology and stable isotope variations in nature; thermodynamics and its geological application; geochemical prospecting.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 303, CHEM 115A CHEM 115B/116AB, MATH 161, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEOL 425 - Economic Geology


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours
    Classification, origin, and alteration of metallic ore deposits. Laboratory sessions on hand sample identification of ore and alteration minerals and petrographic analysis of selected ore suites.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 307 and CHEM 115B/116B. Co-requisite(s): GEOL 307 and CHEM 115B/116B.
    Typically Offered Not Recently Offered
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEOL 426A - Senior Thesis I


    Unit(s): 3
    426A is the first semester of a senior thesis project. A senior thesis is an opportunity for students to engage in primary research. Students must write a proposal, defining the scope of their project. Thesis projects must be a two-semester project. Students will be required to present their projects at the Geology Colloquium.

    Prerequisite(s): thesis advisor consent.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEOL 426B - Senior Thesis II


    Unit(s): 3
    426B is the second semester of a senior thesis project. A senior thesis is an opportunity for students to engage in primary research. Students must write a proposal, defining the scope of their project. Thesis projects must be a two-semester project. Students will be required to present their projects at the Geology Colloquium.

    Prerequisite(s): thesis-advisor consent and GEOL 426A.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEOL 427 - Advanced Field Geology


    Unit(s): 4
    A minimum of five weeks of detailed mapping in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, and the preparation of field reports and geological maps. Students may also complete this course at another university, but should do so only in consultation with the Geology Department. Students must demonstrate equivalence in terms of field hours and course content to GEOL 427.

    Prerequisite(s): senior-level standing in Geology. GEOL 420 strongly recommended.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEOL 495 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Individual study, under guidance of an advisor, of an advanced field, laboratory, or literature problem. The student must have demonstrated ability to work independently and do quality work. The student must have a faculty sponsor who is willing to advise the project and will set up a schedule of meetings for this purpose.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEOL 496 - Selected Topics in Geology


    Unit(s): 1-3
    An intensive study of an advanced topic in geology. Additional fee may be required.

    Prerequisite(s): Adequate preparation for topic under consideration.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for additional credit with new subject matter.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEOL 498 - Geology Practicum


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Application of previously studied theory through supervised instructional work experience in geology, generally as a teaching assistant in geology laboratory classes. Intended for professional growth.

    Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing in Geology and consent of instructor. Student needs to have passed the course that he/she will be a teaching assistant in with a grade of B or better. To be a teaching assistant in GEOL 102 laboratory student needs to have received a grade of B or better in GEOL 303.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for up to a total of 4 units.
    Grading: CNC

Geography, Environment, and Planning

  
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    GEP 200 - Global Environmental Issues


    Unit(s): 3 Lecture: 3 hours Discussion: 3 hours
    An introduction to environmental studies and planning, including: humans in relation to the global ecosystem; an overview of problems of energy use, pollution, resource depletion, population growth, food supply, urbanization, climate change, and biodiversity; and the search for solutions and future prospects.

    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area D5 (Contemporary International Perspectives).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 201 - Global Environmental Systems


    Unit(s): 3
    This course presents a broad survey of how the earth works. It focuses on the processes within, and the relationships between, the four global sub-systems: the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. The course examines how physical, chemical, and biological functions create local, regional, and global climate and landscape patterns. It also explores the links between human activities and changes in climate, vegetation patterns, and landform processes. The course includes weekly two-hour lab sessions in which students participate in field-based data collection exercises and conduct scientific analyses.

    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area B1 (Physical Science).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 202 - Quantitative Methods


    Unit(s): 4
    Lectures and workshop designed to enhance students’ confidence in analytical problem solving. Essential techniques emphasizing environmental applications: translating knowledge into abstract and mathematical models, numerical estimates, basic geometry and trigonometry, dimensional analysis, unit conversions, interpreting statistical data, and graphic display of information. Conceptual introduction to calculus, differential equations, and complex numbers.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion or concurrent enrollment in GE Area B4 (Math/Quantitative Reasoning).
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEP 203 - Human Geography


    Unit(s): 3
    The course introduces students to a spatial perspective of cultural, economic, political, demographic, and environmental processes. We review the deep historical origins of many social processes and examine how they continue to influence our contemporary experience. We also study how these processes change as they move across geographic space and encounter other cultures and places.

    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area D2 (World History and Civilization).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 205 - World Regional Geography


    Unit(s): 3
    This course explores 4-5 world regions from a holistic perspective, examining their economic, political, demographic, cultural, and environmental landscapes with considerable historic depth. The course also considers how each region fits within a larger global political and economic system, and how their roles have changed, particularly with globalization.

    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area D5 (Contemporary International Perspectives).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 206 - Society, Environment, and Sustainable Development


    Unit(s): 3
    The course helps students understand the sustainability of several human-environment relationships, and each student’s own role in perpetuating or changing those relationships. Following an introduction to Earth’s environmental systems, the course critiques several modes of understanding specific environmental problems caused by development. Course concludes with extended study of one globally important human-environment-development nexus.

    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area E (Lifelong Learning & Self-Development).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 215 - GEP Forum


    Unit(s): 1
    Regular weekly departmental lecture series. Outside professional speakers and GEP alumni and faculty report on topics and opportunities relating to careers in Geography, Environment, and Planning.

    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: CNC
  
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    GEP 305 - World Regions in Global Context


    Unit(s): 4
    Selected regions of the world form the basis of study. Economic development, political problems, man-land relationships, and global issues are covered. The course uses geographical methodologies and concepts and is interdisciplinary in its observations of world regions.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students only
    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area D5 (Contemporary International Perspectives).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 310 - Professional Preparation


    Unit(s): 1-2
    This seminar covers topics essential for professional preparation in the fields of geography and environmental studies. Topics include discussions with guest speakers on career options in governmental, private, and non-profit settings; writing highly effective resumes, CVs, and cover letters; and techniques for successful interviewing. The course will also cover preparation for future training in professional and academic fields.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP/ENSP/GEOG majors, juniors or seniors. Crosslisted: GLBL 310.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: CNC
  
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    GEP 312 - Professional Conferences


    Unit(s): 1-2
    Students learn about professional research, presentation, and discourse, and attend research presentations at a professional conference. Conference and travel may include professionally led field trips. The course requires an additional fee.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated Course may be repeated for credit. Up to 2 units of GEP 312 in total may be counted towards the major.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    GEP 313 - Field Experience


    Unit(s): 1-2
    Field experience is provided in a variety of topical areas. The course titles and contents will vary. A fee will be charged for this course. Up to 2 units of GEP 313 in total may be counted toward the major

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit. Please see the current Schedule of Classes for the particular topic offered.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    GEP 314 - Field Experience Abroad


    Unit(s): 2-3
    Field Experience outside the United States (2-3). Cultural and physical studies of people and places through travel, observation and interaction, and oral and written analysis. Destinations include Central and south American countries. Course contents and locations will vary. Check with instructor regarding destination and cost. Offered during Intersession or Summer Session. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of the instructor.
    Typically Offered Not Recently Offered May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    GEP 317 - Internship


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Students in the internship program will be given the opportunity to gain practical experience in their area of study by working in a variety of county and city agencies and organizations in the Sonoma State University service area. Credit is given for three hours per unit work per week as arranged with the internship coordinator. Must have junior- or senior-level standing and a minimum GPA of 2.75, or permission from the Department Chair.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Juniors and Seniors only
    Typically Offered Fall Only May Be Repeated May be repeated once for credit.
    Grading: CNC
  
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    GEP 320 - Geopolitics


    Unit(s): 4
    In this course we dig deep into the field of geopolitics, the struggle for control over territory, transportation corridors, and natural resources. We analyze the origin of the discipline, its historical development, and key contemporary issues, including the Iraq War, the U.S. missile defense shield and the expansion of NATO, the promotion of democracy as a security strategy, Iranian nuclear ambitions, and Chinese military expansion. We will also examine the upsurge of nationalism since the end of the Cold War, and examine ethno-national rebellion from multiple perspectives, including the failure of nation-building, the failure of economic development, and competition over scarce natural resources.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 322 - Globalization and Environments


    Unit(s): 4
    This course critically analyzes the practices and ideas that underlie economic development and the resultant degradation of environments. The class attends to ways that specific people and places have either resisted environmental impoverishment, or alternatively worked together to create different, environmentally and socially sustainable paths to empowerment and well-being.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 323 - Resource Management & Development in Global Perspective


    Unit(s): 4
    This class explores the use and management of natural resources. Each year, it focuses on a different set of renewable and non-renewable resources, such as water, oil, diamonds, rangeland, and others. It addresses topics such as distribution, scarcity, substitution, access and use-rights, resource cartels, regulation, and sustainability. It also looks at how these issues are changing under globalization and the rise of transnational corporations.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 324 - Climate Change and Society


    Unit(s): 4
    This course briefly reviews climate change mechanisms and models. It then turns to its main topics: attempts and failures to mitigate greenhouse gas production, specific predicted challenges, and current and future attempts to adapt to the environmental and social impacts related to changing climates. The course compliments GEP 356.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 325 - Global Food Systems: Scarcity and Sustainability


    Unit(s): 3-4
    This course explores the development of agriculture from its origins to its modern forms. It discusses the historical development and current structure of five agricultural systems: small and large corporate farms in the development of the world, as well as traditional peasant production systems, plantations, and green revolution forms in the developing world. It then considers issues such as world hunger, food aid, global commodity trade, and the affect of biotechnology in both the developed and developing world.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students only
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 327 - Latin America and the Caribbean


    Unit(s): 4
    From an environmental history perspective, the class begins with an investigation of pre-Columbian and post-contact social ecologies. This leads to analysis of more contemporary processes such as rural modernization, the rapid growth of cities and migration, the role of identity and women, and the dynamics of free-trade globalization and international relations.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 328 - Africa South of the Sahara


    Unit(s): 4
    Students explore various historical and contemporary processes that have created Africa’s diverse and complex geography. The course begins with a historical survey of the continent, starting with its great civilizations and continuing through its experiences through colonialism, independence, the cold war, and globalization. This section of the class examines how these major events have played out throughout the different regions of Africa, south of the Sahara. The class then turns directly to thematic issues that are central to a human-geographic perspective of the continent: population, rural/urban dynamics, education and health issues, and human-environment interactions including agricultural systems and conservation issues. Finally, with a deeper understanding of the region, the course addresses present-day political hot spots of post-cold war Africa, and the critical development problems plaguing the continent.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 330 - Environmental History


    Unit(s): 4
    Environmental history offers an earth’s-eye view of the past, by addressing the many ways in which humans have interacted with the natural environment over time. How has the environment shaped the course of human history, and how have human actions and attitudes shaped the environment? And how does studying past environments help us understand our present-day challenges? All too often, historians study the human past without considering nature; similarly, all too often, scientists study nature without considering human history. We will explore the value of integrating these different perspectives, and argue that a historical perspective is absolutely crucial if one hopes to understand contemporary environmental issues.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of GE Area A (Communication and Critical Thinking).
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEP 331 - Restoration and Society


    Unit(s): 4
    This capstone course focuses on the ideas and theories behind environmental restoration work and asks some critical questions about the field: where did the idea of restoration come from? What are the goals of environmental restorations, and how do you know if a project is meeting those goals? What do we mean by the terms “wilderness”, “native”, “diversity”, and so forth? Do environmental mitigation projects really work? We will also look at several specific case studies through the semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Seniors and Graduate students only, consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEP 332 - Environmental Literature


    Unit(s): 3
    A survey of great American environmental books, including H. D. Thoreau’s Walden, John Muir’s Mountains of California, and works by other environmental authors. The course considers the natural, political, cultural, and historical environment of the writers.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior- or senior-level standing.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 335 - U.S. Environmental Policy


    Unit(s): 4
    This class starts with the idea that institutions of government are not a fixed inheritance but choices that are constantly being revised. The goal of the course is to sort out that assertion while providing a basic introduction to both American political institutions and major environmental issues. We will look at choices shaping the structure of governance and tools of environmental policy. Where are we heading in terms of democratic decision-making, responsibility, and accountability? How does the realm of international policy dovetail with national-level governance?

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of GE Area D4.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEP 336 - U.S. Environmental Law


    Unit(s): 3
    Review of environmental law and regulation in the United States generally and California in particular. Overview of federal and California legal systems with emphasis on their role in environmental protection. Evolution of environmental law in the United States, including property rights and environmental justice.

    Prerequisite(s): junior- or senior-level standing.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 337 - Landscape History of the American West


    Unit(s): 3
    Use of and interactions with natural resources have transformed the American West over time, and greatly affected the western environment as we know it today. This seminar takes a historical look at the settlement, development, and management of the western landscape, both in terms of natural resources (timber, water, grazing, parks etc.) but also in terms of cultural settlement and use - and considers landscape as a tool for understanding the cultural/social/political history of a place. Students can expect to do some serious reading, writing, and thinking about how and why the West has become such a distinctive natural and cultural landscape. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only or consent of instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): juniors, seniors, or graduate students. Crosslisted: HIST 467
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEP 339 - Special Topics in Society, Environment, & Development


    Unit(s): 2-4
    Intensive study of selected topics related to Society, Environment, and Development. Topics vary from semester to semester.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 340 - Applied Ecology


    Unit(s): 3-4
    This course explores major concepts of ecology and examines current environmental issues in light of these concepts. Topics include: relationship between organisms and the physical environment, community-level ecological processes, the structure and function of ecosystems and their distribution on the planet, evolutionary processes, and population ecology. Environmental issues include loss of biodiversity, global climate change, invasive species, and others. Development of speaking and writing skills is a significant element of the course. Field trip required.

    Prerequisite(s): completion of GE Area B2 or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEP 341 - Conservation Biology


    Unit(s): 3-4
    Interdisciplinary investigation into biological, management, economic, and ethical issues associated with the current extinction of species. Course will cover principles and applications of ecology, population biology and genetics, biogeography, and social sciences for protection and management of biodiversity in the face of current widespread alteration of the environment. At least one field trip required.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 340 or BIOL 131 and Junior/Senior standing. Co-requisite(s): GEP 340 or BIOL 131.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 343 - Biogeography


    Unit(s): 4
    Biogeography is the study of plant and animals distributions at local to global spatial scales, and seeks to understand the physical, biological and human processes that determine these patterns through time. This is a highly integrative field of inquiry, pulling on concepts, theories and data from general ecology, evolutionary biology, geology, physical and human geography, and geospatial science. With its perspective on broad spatial and temporal scales, Biogeography is particularly relevant for designing viable long-term strategies for nature conservation in the face of modern human-induced changes, such as global warming and habitat conversion. This course uses lectures, reading assignments and an individual student project to explore past and present biota at regional to global scales, and a field trip to understand our local northern California ecosystems.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 201, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 350 - Geomorphology


    Unit(s): 4 Lecture: 3 hours Laboratory: 3 hours
    Explores the relationships between surface processes such as weathering, mass movements, running water, wind, waves, and glacial ice, and the landforms these processes create. The course looks at geomorphic systems and the role of tectonics and climate in changing the balance of these systems. Actual research projects are presented to demonstrate geomorphic approaches to environmental questions. Students are exposed to research methods in the field and lab. Field trips and field reports, use of maps, and hands-on labs are included. A fee will be charged for this course.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 201, GEOL 102, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 351 - Natural Hazards


    Unit(s): 3
    This course focuses on geologic and atmospheric processes that result in natural hazards (e.g. hurricanes and earthquakes) and anthropogenic-caused climate change. It covers hazard monitoring, predication, risk assessment, and mitigation. The course examines the intersection between natural hazards and human society and the magnification of hazards to disasters and catastrophes.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of GE Golden Four (A1, A2, A3, B4) with a C- or better and completion of B1, B2 and at least 45 units
    GE Category: Upper Division B
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Teaching Mode: Face-to-Face Grading: Graded
  
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    GEP 352 - Soil Science


    Unit(s): 3-4
    An introduction to soil science emphasizing applications to agronomy, archaeology, botany, ecology, engineering, geography, geology, land use planning, hazardous materials management, and water quality. Technical exercises emphasize low-cost scientific analytical equipment.

    Typically Offered Not Recently Offered
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 354 - Watershed Hydrology and Management


    Unit(s): 4
    This course focuses on the flow of water between Earth’s atmosphere, surface and the root zone of the soil, with a focus on the watershed unit. The hydrologic processes affecting surface and groundwater resources in a watershed, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and runoff will be examined in lectures and labs.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 201, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEP 355 - Weather and Climate


    Unit(s): 3
    An exploration of the atmosphere, how it differs from place to place and time to time. The role of radiation, temperature, humidity, evaporation, cloudiness, precipitation, and surface factors (topography, exposure and altitude) in differentiating world climates. Climate’s influence on man physically and culturally, in history and prehistory. Climate change, drought and flood, and solar radiation are among the topics investigated in detail.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of GE Golden Four (A1, A2, A3, B4) with a C- or better and completion of B1, B2 and at least 45 units. 
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 356 - Global Climate Change: Past, Present, and Future


    Unit(s): 4
    An advanced course focusing on evidence of past climate change and predicted future change. Research methods used to reconstruct past climates are explored. Climate dynamics and the response of the environment will be examined.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 201 or GEOL 102, and Juniors, Seniors and Graduate students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Odd Years
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 359 - Special Topics in Environmental Systems


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Intensive study of selected topics related to Environmental Systems. Topics vary from semester to semester.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEP 360 - Introduction to Planning


    Unit(s): 3
    An overview of land use planning and associated concerns, such as environmental protection, transportation, open space preservation, housing, economic development, urban design, and public finance. Consideration of the evolving forms and functions of cities, towns, and rural areas and society’s attitudes toward development, environmental concerns, and the appropriate role of government in regulating land use. Course addresses general plans, zoning, growth management, environmental impact assessment, and the local political process relating to planning. Current trends in planning and sustainable community development.

    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 361 - Planning Theory and Methodology


    Unit(s): 3-4
    Exploration of evolving planning thought and processes as a basis for understanding planning practice. Comprehensive planning, incremental, and communicative action models. Planning and local politics. The values and ethics of the professional planner. Mediating environmental and land use disputes. Basic analytical, methodological, and communication skills utilized in urban, environmental, and business planning.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 360 or can be taken concurrently, junior- or senior-level standing,
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEP 362 - Environmental Impact Assessment


    Unit(s): 2-3
    The theory and practice of environmental impact assessment (“EIA”). The role of EIA and impact mitigation in policy development and implementation. The practice of preparing environmental review documents as mandated by state and federal law. The relationship between environmental review and comprehensive planning.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 363 - Land Use Law


    Unit(s): 3
    Overview of the law governing land use in California. Fundamentals of the legal system and legal analysis. Substantive law regarding planning and zoning, subdivision, development conditions, growth management, land use initiatives, vested rights, and design review. Constitutional protection of property rights.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students only.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 364 - Environmental Planning


    Unit(s): 3-4
    This course focuses on the relationship between land use planning and environmental and natural resources concerns, using property and landscape as our primary lenses. We will consider how ideas regarding resource management, open space, biodiversity, “sustainability”, etc., are reflected in land use planning processes and practices. The course will examine broad planning and regulatory tools, such as EISs, regional planning, and resource management planning, and more specific applications such as Habitat Conservation Plans and open space planning.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 365 - Healthy Communities Planning


    Unit(s): 3-4
    Introduces students to the field of planning for healthy communities, including the relationship of the built environment and land conservation to healthy eating, bicycling and other forms of active transportation, walkability and active living, mental health, crime and violence, access to health care, health equity, etc. Students will evaluate the rapidly evolving thinking on these topics.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students only.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
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    GEP 366 - Planning for Sustainable Communities


    Unit(s): 3
    Sustainability as a concept in environmental and land use planning. Definitions and models of sustainability. Evaluation of sustainable development on global, national, regional, and local levels. Practical experience with city and county planning for sustainability.

    Prerequisite(s): Juniors and seniors only; GEP 360 recommended.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 367 - Transportation Planning


    Unit(s): 3
    Theory, methods, and tools related to the systematic analysis of city, regional, and rural transportation problems. The focus is on fundamental land use and transportation interrelationships. Transportation as an integrated system composed of automobiles, public transit, bicycles, and pedestrian travel modes. Transportation impact assessment. Congestion management, energy conservation, sustainability, and environmental impact considerations.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 360 recommended.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
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    GEP 368 - Urban Design I: The Urban Form


    Unit(s): 3
    c open spaces, streets, buildings, neighborhoods, city gateways, signs, and other elements of the urban scene. Meaning of “sense of place.” The effects of public policy and regulations on urban form. The scale, pattern, and image of urban form elements. Planning for new communities, historic preservation, urban plazas, and public art.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior- or senior-level standing; Introduction to Planning (GEP 360) is recommended.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 370 - Globalization and the City


    Unit(s): 4
    This course examines the evolution of cities as local and global political, economic and social centers. It explore the forces that drove urban growth and change in the 20th century, with a focus on how these forces shape contemporary issues such as inequality, cultural change, and segregation.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 371 - Social Geography


    Unit(s): 3
    Studies aspects of demography, migration, and the spatial dimension of social organization. Included in the course are the spatial perspectives of social well-being, poverty, crime, and ethnicity. The spatial structure of human settlement, as well as political, religious, and social values will be discussed.

    GE Category: Satisfies upper-division GE Area E (Integrated Person).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 373 - Energy, Technology, and Society


    Unit(s): 4
    A lecture/discussion course designed to assist students in understanding energy as a fundamental measure of organization, structure, and transformation in society. Principal topics include: energy history; thermodynamics; energy resources and conversion technologies; global issues and trends; environmental impacts; energy economics, institutions, and politics. Elementary quantitative analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior- or senior-level standing, and completion of GE Area B4 (Math/Quantitative Reasoning) or prior or concurrent enrollment in GEP 202.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 379 - Special Topics in Sustainable Communities


    Unit(s): 2-4
    Intensive study of selected topics related to Sustainable Communities. Topics vary from semester to semester.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 380 - Environmental Remote Sensing


    Unit(s): 4
    Environmental remote sensing uses imagery from satellite and airborne sensors to map properties of the Earth over broad spatial scales. This course develops an understanding of physical principles behind remote sensing, explores a range of sensors, spatial scales, and locations, and uses image processing techniques for extracting useful environmental information.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 385 - Cartographic Visualization


    Unit(s): 3-4 Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 3 hours
    Map and graphic methods in geography: history, design, theory, and construction. Topics include selection of map projections, use of scales, generalization, data input and processing, color, visualization of spatial data, and map production. Emphasis is placed on effective communication through graphic design. Covers the increasing role of geographic information systems (GIS) in cartography. Also examines the collection of geographic data, such as with global positioning systems (GPS). Exercises guide students through increasingly complex methods of data collection and cartographic construction. Laboratory fee may be charged; see current Schedule of Classes.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 387 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    Unit(s): 4
    Geographic information system (GIS) technologies provide researchers and policy-makers with a powerful analytical framework for making decisions and predictions. As with any technology, the appropriate use of GIS depends greatly on the knowledge and skills of the user. This course addresses the scientific and technical aspects of working with geographical data, so that GIS users understand the general principles, opportunities, and pitfalls of recording, collecting, storing, retrieving, analyzing, and presenting spatial information. Both fundamental concepts and “hands on” experience with state-of-the-art software are incorporated through readings, lecture discussion, and laboratory assignments. The first half of the course focuses on the “nuts and bolts” of how a GIS works, while the second half concentrates on methods for spatial analysis and modeling.

    Prerequisite(s): Course requires a basic competency with Microsoft operating system and Office applications.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 388 - Environmental Geographic Information Systems


    Unit(s): 3-4
    Environmental issues typically involve a range of physical, ecological and socioeconomic factors with complex interactions that span multiple spatial and temporal scales. Computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are particularly well-suited for describing, analyzing and modeling environmental problems and datasets, and the technology is widely used for local- to global-scale research, impact assessment, conservation planning and natural resource management. This course investigates a range of environmental problems through the unique perspective afforded by geospatial data analysis within a GIS. Lectures introduce the ecological, scientific and societal issues associated with major environmental issues of our time, such as land-use change, biodiversity loss, and global carbon emissions. These issues are then quantitatively analyzed with real-world spatial datasets using GIS-based methods and tools in coordinated laboratory exercises. In the process, students extend and strengthen GIS skills and concepts acquired through GEP 387.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 387, basic college-level math, statistics helpful.
    Typically Offered Spring Odd Years
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 389 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems


    Unit(s): 3
    This course provides greater depth in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Through lab exercises, students build GIS databases, perform geospatial analyses, and create maps. Students conduct an independent research project on a topic of their choice, gather the appropriate spatial data, conduct GIS analyses, and present their results.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 387.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 390 - Environmental Data Analysis


    Unit(s): 4
    This course will introduce students to environmental data (Atmospheric, Oceanic and Earths surface). Students will learn how to access, pre-process and analyze data using different statistical methods and geographic information systems (GIS). The course will also examine research questions that can be answered using these types of data and analyses. Lecture/Lab.

    Prerequisite(s): Course requires a basic competency with Microsoft operating system and Office applications.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    GEP 411 - Seminar in Planning Professional Practice


    Unit(s): 1-2
    Discussion of situations and challenges new planners are likely to encounter early in their professional careers. Seminars include discussions with professional planners on such topics as working with the public, elected officials, and other professionals; maintaining relations with the press; ethical dilemmas; and other matters of current concern. Discussion of students’ internship experiences. Must be taken within two semesters of graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP/ENSP/GEOG majors, senior-level standing.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: CNC
  
  •  

    GEP 416 - Energy Forum


    Unit(s): 1-2
    Speakers, including community professionals, program alumni and University faculty, cover a wide variety of energy issues with formal presentations followed by discussion period.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior- or senior-level standing.
    Typically Offered Spring Only May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit.
    Grading: CNC
  
  •  

    GEP 418 - Lab Assistant in GEP


    Unit(s): 2
    Open only to advanced students who have been invited by the faculty member to serve as a Lab Assistant for GEP 201 Global Environmental Systems. Intended to give students experience in assisting the instructor in the laboratory.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated once for credit.
    Grading: CNC
  
  •  

    GEP 419 - Teaching Assistant in GEP


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Open only to advanced students. Intended to give students experience in assisting the instructor in a Geography, Environment, and Planning (GEP) course by doing research and tutoring students in the class.

    Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor. This
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit.
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 440 - Field Methods


    Unit(s): 2
    This course provides hands-on experience with field sampling techniques commonly used in biophysical data collection and spatial inquiry. Course topics include sample design, field measurements, statistical data analysis, report writing, and the use of field equipment. Field work will be conducted mainly in the Fairfield Osborn Preserve and surrounding area. Data collected from vegetation sampling, soil descriptions, microclimate measurements, and geomorphologic observations will be used to interpret the natural and anthropogenic landscape. Throughout the course, students will work with Global Positioning System (GPS) units to accurately locate their field samples on the Earth, allowing for subsequent spatial analysis. Laboratory fee may be charged; see current Schedule of Classes.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 201, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Spring Odd Years
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 441 - Lab Methods


    Unit(s): 2
    This course provides hands-on experience with laboratory analysis techniques commonly used in physical geography. Topics include stratigraphic and laboratory analyses, report writing, and data presentation. Data collected from soil and sediment profiles and tree rings will be used to interpret environmental conditions. Students will follow laboratory methods, protocols, and use analytical equipment. Laboratory fee may be charged; see current Schedule of Classes.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 201 or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 443 - Introduction to Agroecology


    Unit(s): 2
    This course provides a broad introduction to the design and management of agroecosystems. Students explore the theory and practice of agroecology and how it’s principles address social and environmental problems in the global food system. Students are introduced to agroecological production methods, including soil management, water systems, biodiversity development, integrated pest management, flower production and urban gardening methods, and applications of these methods in a student garden. Approximately half of this course is classroom-based instruction while the other half is hands-on garden-based work.

    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: CNC
  
  •  

    GEP 444 - Native Plants in Restoration


    Unit(s): 2
    This field and lab course focuses on the applied aspects of plant propagation and the appropriate placement of native plants in landscape and restoration settings in California. Topics include native plants and plant communities, techniques for selecting, collecting and replicating plants for production, and restoration site preparation and maintenance. Additional topics may include ethnobotany, career opportunities, restoration principals, botany, plant disease and sanitation, invasive plant removal, wildcrafting, guest speakers and fieldtrips.

    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: CNC
  
  •  

    GEP 445 - Restoration Ecology


    Unit(s): 4
    Lecture and field course introducing major concepts and practical aspects of restoration ecology and land management. Topics include: the conservation context of restoration, restoration goals, measuring success, experimental approaches, dynamic systems and change over time, disturbance, restoring animal populations and the role of animals in ecosystem restoration, and educational elements of restoration. Practical techniques covered include: seed collection, ex-situ seed and plant management and propagation, invasive species removal, planting native species, and others. Topics are addressed in a variety of diverse local systems.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 130 and BIOL 131. Course fee.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 473 - Thermal Energy Management


    Unit(s): 3-4
    An introduction to energy management in residential and commercial buildings, focusing on space heating and cooling, and hot water. Fundamentals of heat transfer, thermal properties of building materials, building load calculations, and energy economics.

    Prerequisite(s): Juniors and seniors only, completion of MATH 160, MATH 161, MATH 161B or GEP 202, PHYS 114 or PHYS 210A or equivalent.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 474 - Electrical Energy Management


    Unit(s): 3-4
    An overview of energy management approaches in residential and commercial settings that involve electrical devices, including lighting, motors, and HVAC. Fundamentals of electricity, electric power delivery, and the workings of common appliances; energy economics. Strong algebra background and PHYS 210 recommended.

    Prerequisite(s): Juniors and seniors only, completion of MATH 160, MATH 161, MATH 161B or GEP 202, PHYS 114 or PHYS 210A or equivalent.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 475 - Passive Solar Design


    Unit(s): 3-4
    Fundamentals and advanced applications of passive solar design, including: site analysis and design; passive applications (sunspace, trombe wall, convective loop, direct, and indirect gain systems); passive performance predictions; and economic payback analysis. Computer applications and student design projects.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 473, junior- or senior-level standing or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 476 - Small Scale Energy Sources


    Unit(s): 3-4
    Course will focus on functional design of small-scale wind, photovoltaic, biomass, and hydroelectric energy sources. Siting, evaluating potentially available power, design of fully operable installation, and by-products and waste streams will be discussed. Energy storage mechanisms, interconnections to existing energy networks, and energy cost comparisons will be examined.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 474, junior- or senior-level standing, or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 477 - Computer Applications in Energy Management Laboratory


    Unit(s): 4
    Applications laboratory addressing state-of-the-art computer programs in this field. Focus on simulation-and-design programs utilized in residential and commercial building compliance. Student projects and presentations.

    Prerequisite(s): GEP 473, junior- or senior-level standing.
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 490 - Capstone Project Methods


    Unit(s): 2-3
    This is the first semester of an intensive, year-long project in which students conduct original research and/or produce a professional product. During Fall semester, students formulate a research project and develop the research skills needed to conduct that project. Students choose an appropriate section in consultation with an advisor.

    Crosslisted: GLBL 496
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: Graded
  
  •  

    GEP 491 - Capstone Project


    Unit(s): 3-4
    A continuation of GEP 490. In the Spring semester, students conduct their work, produce their final product, and present their results. Students continue the same section that they completed in GEP 490.

    Crosslisted: GLBL 498
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: Graded
  
  •  

    GEP 494 - Capstone: Internship


    Unit(s): 4
    Students produce a capstone project in their area of study while working in a county or city agency, or other organization. Credit is given with completion of three components, all pre-arranged in consultation with the internship coordinator. 1. Students will work 135 hours, verified through their direct supervisor. 2. Students will formulate, propose and conduct a research project in the context of that experience and write a concise and professional report on their analysis and findings. 3. Students will present that research orally. Must have senior-level standing and permission from the student advisor and the internship coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): Class open to Seniors only
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    GEP 495 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Independent study designed in consultation with an instructor. Requires prior approval of GEP faculty member and department chair.

    Prerequisite(s): successful completion of at least two GEP courses and submission of a completed SSUspecial studies form; GEP majors or minors or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring May Be Repeated Course may be repeated for credit for up to 8 units.
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 496 - Selected Topics


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Intensive study of selected topics related to geography, environment, and/or planning. Topics vary from semester to semester.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GEP 497 - Special Topics: Lab


    Unit(s): 2-4
    A single subject or set of related subjects not ordinarily covered by the GEP Department. Offerings will vary depending on visiting faculty, experimental courses, and educational needs.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    GEP 595 - Graduate Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-6
    Advanced research and writing. Students work under close supervision of faculty members. Subject matter variable.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and completed special studies form.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit.
    Grading: OPT

German

  
  •  

    GER 101 - First Semester - The Personal World


    Unit(s): 4
    German for beginners. Through communicative activities covering the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), students learn to ask and answer questions and share information about themselves, their families, and their daily activities.

    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area C3 (Comparative Perspectives and Foreign Languages).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GER 102 - Second Semester - Contemporary Germany


    Unit(s): 4
    Expansion of the skills acquired in GER 101. Students build on their knowledge of German culture. They improve their communicative competence, and develop skills needed to negotiate a variety of everyday situations in Germany.

    Prerequisite(s): GER 101 or consent of instructor.
    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area C3 (Comparative Perspectives and Foreign Languages).
    Typically Offered Fall & Spring
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GER 195 - Elementary Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Directed individual study.

    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GER 200 - Intermediate German: The German-Speaking World Today


    Unit(s): 4
    This course introduces various cities and regions that provide the context to review first-year German. Students develop ability to communicate in German and their understanding of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland by engaging with increasingly complex topics (i.e. education, environmental issues, politics, history).

    Prerequisite(s): GER 102 or consent of instructor.
    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area C3 (Comparative Perspectives and Foreign Languages).
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GER 210 - Intermediate German through Film


    Unit(s): 4
    This course uses films to expand students’ knowledge of the history and culture of the German-speaking world. Films promote vocabulary enhancement, grammar review as well as improvement of speaking and writing skills. Cross-cultural comparisons encourage critical thinking skills.

    Prerequisite(s): GER 102. This course may be taken before GER 200.
    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area C3 (Comparative Perspectives and Foreign Languages).
    Typically Offered Spring Only
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GER 300 - Advanced German Studies


    Unit(s): 4
    Prepares students for the Goethe-Certificate B1 proficiency examination (Zertifikat Deutsch). Students acquire differentiated vocabulary, greater grammatical accuracy, and improve their speaking and writing skills by focusing on varied language use in different contexts. Content may include: issues of gender or multiculturalism, the continued influence of the Nazi past, and German reunification.

    Prerequisite(s): GER 200 and GER 210, or consent of instructor. Course may be taken before GER 314.
    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area C3 (Comparative Perspectives and/or Foreign Languages).
    Typically Offered Spring Only May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit under different subtitles. Must be taken in residence at SSU.
    Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GER 314 - Love and Desire in German Literature


    Unit(s): 4
    Studies of literature, including film, art, and the cultural history of German-speaking countries.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.
    GE Category: Satisfies GE Area C2.
    Typically Offered Fall Only May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit under different title.
    Teaching Mode: Taught in English. Grading: OPT
  
  •  

    GER 315 - German Language and Literature


    Unit(s): 1
    Readings and discussion of selected literary works in German. Review of vocabulary and grammar. Includes practice of pronunciation. Students pursuing the minor or special major in German must take this course concurrently with GER 314. Also open to other German students.

    Prerequisite(s): GER 102 or consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Fall Only
    Grading: GRD
  
  •  

    GER 395 - Community Involvement Program


    Unit(s): 1-4
    CIP involves students in basic community projects, performing such tasks as tutoring, coaching, and assisting others in the process of learning. Students receive 1 to 4 units, depending on the specific tasks performed.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit.
    Grading: CNC
  
  •  

    GER 495 - Special Studies


    Unit(s): 1-4
    Directed individual study.

    Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.
    Typically Offered Variable Intermittently May Be Repeated May be repeated for credit up to 8 units.
    Grading: OPT
 

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